Tag Archives: UN

Environmental Rights and International Peace: Protections of Biological and Cultural Diversity: Emerging Recognition of Local Community Rights in Ecosystems Under International Environmental Law (L. P. Breckenridge)

Author(s)

Lee. P. Breckenridge

Keywords

United Nations, UN, environmental protection, development, international policies, biological diversity, ecosystems, international peace, cultural diversity, local communities, community rights

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992 forged a new consensus on international environmental policies to protect the world’s biological diversity and its most fragile ecosystems. The documents produced by UNCED (the Rio Declaration, 1Agenda 21, 2 and the Forest Principles 3 ) and the two conventions opened for signature at the conference (the Convention on Biological Diversity 4 and the Convention on Climate Change 5 ) all take important steps toward the formulation of international standards governing the use and management of living resources to preserve their diversity and renewability into the future.

The articulation of international environmental requirements is accompanied, strikingly, by a new recognition of local communities’ roles in protecting biological diversity and ecosystem viability. “Grassroots” empowerment has become a centerpiece of the environmental agenda. Throughout the UNCED documents, 6 a mandate for decentralization goes hand-in-hand with the centralization expressed in new international environmental norms and institutional mechanisms. International environmental law is emerging as a new source of authority for pluralism, and protection of biological diversity has become inextricably linked to protection of cultural diversity…

Citation

(1992) 59 Tennessee Law Review 735

Paper

Environmental Rights and International Peace: Protections of Biological and Cultural Diversity: Emerging Recognition of Local Community Rights in Ecosystems Under International Environmental Law

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Road to 2015: The European Union and the Realisation of the Human Right to Water (V. Deloge)

Author

Vivien Deloge

Keywords

Human right, drinking water, sanitation, UN, EU, rights-based approach, EU institutional endorsement

Abstract

Following the recognition of the human right to drinking water and sanitation by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly and Human Rights Council in 2010, one can wonder to what extent the normative content of the right to water is efficiently implemented in the European Union in accordance with the obligation of result laid down under Arts 11 and 12 of the International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights. Adopting a rights based approach, this article considers the realisation of the quality, accessibility and affordability contents of the right to water in EU legislation and its compliance with Member States’ obligations under international and European human rights instruments, before examining the institutional endorsement of the right in the EU legal order.

Citation

(2012) 16 New Zealand Journal of Environmental Law 1.

Paper

Road to 2015: The European Union and the Realisation of the Human Right to Water

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Exhuming a UN for ‘We the Peoples’ (T Jenkins)

Author

Tony Jenkins

Keywords

UN, human rights, health, environmental sustainability

Abstract

Over the past several months I have sat nervously in fear, busily biting my lip, listening to my colleagues one by one declare the death of the United Nations. Their fears, and mine alike, were triggered by the unilateral U.S. declaration of war on Iraq without bringing a Security Council resolution to vote. The talk around the academic coffeehouse circuit says that the UN’s legitimacy has been completely undermined and that its ability to effectively manage future conflicts is uncertain. Recently various liberal-minded editorials have attempted to reaffirm the UN’s relevance, giving particular attention to post-war reconstruction and its continuous global work in human rights, health and environmental sustainability. But even these UN successes are not free from jeopardy. In its treatment of post-war Iraq the U.S. has managed to ignore or undermine the UN’s experience in these regards as well. These editorials have stated the obvious: that the U.S. still scoffs at the idea of global governance and seemingly only wants to play by its own rules. While truthful, these observations remain locked in the nation-state military security paradigm. It existed when the UN was formed, and unfortunately remains just as dominant today. Perhaps the greatest threat posed by the belligerent U.S. security policy is that it undermines the hope provided by other UN functions, such as promoting human rights standards, clean water supplies, women’s education and reproductive health, social and political justice, programs of disarmament, and environmental sustainability.

Citation

(2003) 15 Peace Review 479-482

Paper

Exhuming a UN for “We the Peoples”

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The UN Human Rights System and the Protection of the Environment (D.K. Anton)

Author

Donald K. Anton (Australian National University (ANU) – College of Law)

Keywords

Human Rights, Environment, United Nations

Abstract

The following is a draft chapter in a forthcoming text on Human Rights and the Environment by Anton and Shelton, to be published by Cambridge Univ. Press in 2009. The chapter walks students through possible avenues for environmental protection within the U.N. human rights system.

Citation

ANU College of Law Research Paper No. 08-41/University of Michigan Public Law Working Paper No. 139 (24 September 2008)

Paper

The United Nations Human Rights System and the Protection of the Environment

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The Human Right to a Viable Environment (S.T. Ramnewash-Oemrawsingh)

Author

Sangini T. Ramnewash-Oemrawsingh

Keywords

ECHR, environmental issues, Strasbourg system for protection of human rights, case law, human rights systems, UN, international law

Abstract

Human rights tribunals are regularly confronted with complaints regarding human rights violations caused by environmental degradation. This book deals with the effectiveness of incorporating environmental dimensions into existing human rights and analyses the feasibility of a separate enforceable human right relating to the environment. Including chapters on the relevant case law of several regional human rights systems, such as the European Convention on Human Rights, the American Convention on Human Rights and global human rights systems, such as the UN International Convention on Civil and Political Rights, it demonstrates that incorporating environmental aspects within existing human rights is problematic and recommends the insertion of a right to a viable environment in all human rights systems.

Thorough description and clear survey of relevant case law organised under relevant convention provisions allows the reader to get a good overview of all relevant case law • Detailed analysis of the feasibility of a human right to a viable environment including the formulation demonstrates the difficulties of the development of a ‘new’ human right • Subjects that are usually discussed separately by authors are all examined, giving an overview of all the issues relating to the subject

Citation

Sangini T. Ramnewash-Oemrawsingh, The Human Right to a Viable Environment (CUP, 2010)

Book

The Human Right to a Viable Environment

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