Tag Archives: Superfund

Toxic Loopholes: Failures and Future Prospects for Environmental Law (C. Collins)

Author

Craig Collins (California University, USA)

Keywords

The EPA, The Clean Air Act, The Clean Water Act, Superfund, RCRA, TSCA, The Endangered Species Act, Planetary problems

Abstract

The EPA was established to enforce the environmental laws Congress enacted during the 1970s. Yet today lethal toxins still permeate our environment, causing widespread illness and even death. Toxic Loopholes investigates these laws, and the agency charged with their enforcement, to explain why they have failed to arrest the nation’s rising environmental crime wave and clean up the country’s land, air and water. This book illustrates how weak laws, legal loopholes and regulatory negligence harm everyday people struggling to clean up their communities. It demonstrates that our current system of environmental protection pacifies the public with a false sense of security, dampens environmental activism, and erects legal barricades and bureaucratic barriers to shield powerful polluters from the wrath of their victims. After examining the corrosive economic and political forces undermining environmental law making and enforcement, the final chapters assess the potential for real improvement and the possibility of building cooperative international agreements to confront the rising tide of ecological perils threatening the entire planet.

• Carefully examines the flaws in America’s major environmental statutes without confounding the reader with dense legal jargon • Highlights the human impact of these legal and regulatory failures • Makes clear, realistic recommendations for improvement and reform

Citation

Craig Collins, Toxic Loopholes: Failures and Future Prospects for Environmental Law (CUP, New York 2010)

Book

Toxic Loopholes: Failures and Future Prospects for Environmental Law

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Superfund at 30 (M.L. Judy & K.N. Probst)

Author(s)

Martha L. Judy and Katherine Nicole Probst

Keywords

Superfund, CERCLA, Trust fund, taxes, environmental, brownfields, cost recovery, liability, natural resources damages, contribution, joint and several, cleanup, spill, emergency, remediation, removal, history, EPA, NPL, environmental policy, environmental economics, environmental liability

Abstract

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction 192
I. Cleaning Up Contaminated Sites 200
A. Program Accomplishments 205
B. NPL Listings/Deletions 206
C. Construction Complete 209
D. Government Performance Results Act Measures 210
E. Removal Actions 212
II. Paying for Cleanup: Taxes and Liability 213
A. Superfund Trust Fund 216
B. Liability as a Funding Mechanism 221
C. Spreading Costs Among Private Parties 230
III. Issues on the Horizon 241
A. Can the Quality and Pace of Cleanups Be Improved? 242
B. What Steps Need to Be Taken to Ensure a Robust and Reliable Long-term Stewardship – or Post-cleanup – Program? 243
C. Will Private Parties Continue To Contribute Work and Money to NPL Cleanups, and Will They Continue To Clean Up Sites on Their Own? 244
D. What Are the Funding Needs for the Superfund Program over the Next Five to Ten Years? 246
E. Improving Superfund Requires Increased Program Evaluation and Greater Transparency 247

Citation

(2009) 11 Vermont Journal of Environmental Law 191

Paper

Superfund at 30

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail