Tag Archives: social movements

Dangerous Intersections: Feminism, Population and Environment (J. Silliman & Y. King)

Editor(s)

Jael Silliman and Ynestra King

Keywords

Population explosion, environmental degradation, economic development

Abstract

Dangerous Intersections provides a multicultural and international perspective on three major global problems: environmental degradation, economic development and the population ‘explosion‘. It presents crucial alternative voices and approaches to the short-sighted policies supported by the mainstream and NGOs alike – policies that focus on the fertility of poor black women – in both North and South – as the primary threat to the ecologial viability of the plant.

Citation

Jael Silliman and Ynestra King (eds), Dangerous Intersections: Feminism, Population and Environment (Zed Books, 1997)

Book

Dangerous Intersections: Feminism, Population and Environment

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Teaching and learning guide for: environmental justice (J. Sze, J. London)

Author

Julie Sze and Jonathan London

Keywords

Environmental justice; environmental racism; urban; planning; public health; law; ethnic studies; public policy; social movements; environmental and social inequalities.

Abstract

Over the last 25 years, the environmental justice movement has emerged from its earliest focus on US social movements combating environmental racism to an influential global phenomenon. Environmental justice research has also undergone spectacular growth and diffusion in the last two decades. From its earliest roots in sociology, the field is now firmly entrenched in several different academic disciplines including geography, urban planning, public health, law, ethnic studies, and public policy. Environmental justice refers simultaneously to a vibrant and growing academic research field, a system of social movements aimed at addressing various environmental and social inequalities, and public policies crafted to ameliorate conditions of environmental and social injustice. Academia is responding to this social problem by offering courses under various rubrics, such as ‘Race, Poverty and the Environment, Environmental Racism, Environmental Justice’, ‘Urban Planning, Public Health And Environmental Justice’, and so on. Courses on environmental justice offer students opportunities to critically and reflexively explore issues of race and racism, social inequality, social movements, public/environmental health, public policy and law, and intersections of science and policy. Integrating modules on environmental justice can help professors engage students in action research, service learning, and more broadly, critical pedagogy.

This article offers an overview of the current state of the field and offers a range of resources for teaching concepts of environmental racism, inequality and injustice in the classroom.

Citation

(2009) 3(6) Sociology Compass, 1022-1028.

Paper

Teaching and learning guide for: environmental justice.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability and Peace (V. Shiva)

Author

Vandana Shiva

Keywords

Earth Democracy, Living Economies, Living Democracies, Living Cultures

Abstract

A leading voice in struggles for global justice, Vandana Shiva is a world renowned environmental activist and physicist. With Earth Democracy, her most extensive treatment of the struggles she helped bring to international attention – genetic food engineering, cultural theft, and natural resource privatisation – Shiva uncovers their link to the rising tide of fundamentalisms, violence against women, and planetary death.

Starting in the 16th century with the initial enclosure of the British commons, Shiva reveals how the commons continue to shrink as more natural resources are patented and privatized. As our ecological sustainability and cultural diversity erode, so too is human life rendered disposable. Through the forces of neoliberal globalization, economic and social exclusion ignite violence across lines of difference, threatening the lives of millions.

Yet these brutal extinctions are not the only trend shaping human history. Struggles on the streets of Seattle and Cancún and in homes and farms across the world, have yielded a set of principles based on inclusion, nonviolence, reclaiming the commons, and freely sharing the earth‘s resources. These ideals, which Shiva calls Earth Democracy, serve as an urgent call to peace and as the basis for a just and sustainable future.

Citation

Vandana Shiva, Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability and Peace (Zed Books, 2005)

Book

Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability and Peace

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Do human rights help or hinder environmental protection? (C. Gearty)

Author

Conor Gearty (LSE, UK)

Keywords

human rights, environmental protection, social movements, civil and political rights, economic and social rights

Abstract

It is acknowledged that traditional approaches to human rights can have and have had a negative impact in the field of environmental protection. But the emphasis in human rights on controlling the abuse of power and its capacity to equip social movements with a language of protest and a platform for change shows the potential for mutually beneficial connections between the two fields. The use made by environmental activists of various human rights that are to be found in international and regional laws is considered, as well as the way new social movements in the environmental arena have deployed the language of rights to promote their goals. It is concluded that a mutually reciprocal relationship between the two fields is both possible and – given the threat of climate change – essential.

Citation

(2010) 1 Journal or Human Rights and the Environment 7

Paper

Do human rights help or hinder environmental protection?

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Environment and Citizenship (M.J. Smith and P. Pangsapa)

Author(s)

Mark J. Smith and Piya Pangsapa

Keywords

Environmental and ecological citizenship, environmental justice, risks, environmental movements

Abstract

This timely book outlines the debates on environmental and ecological citizenship that have emerged out of the concern with environmental justice since the 1990s. The book demonstrates how awareness of environmental hazards, injustices and new forms of risk is only effective when it generates strategies for political change. It examines how environmental movements have become increasingly involved in governance processes at the national, regional and intergovernmental levels, in contexts such as the EU, UN and LA21 initiatives. The authors argue that while ‘rights-discourse’ has highlighted the status of specific identities, taking account of obligation prompts a consideration of social, cultural, political, economic and environmental injustices. Tackling these injustices demands a concern with both entitlements and obligations of all relevant parties and constituencies.

Using new evidence and case studies, this book explores:

– the new vocabulary of citizenship
– how successful environmental policy-making depends on the responsible actions of civil society actors as much as on governments and international treaties
– how stakeholding processes and participatory research in environmental decision-making transform deliberation processes and civic engagement
– the increased importance of transnational networks creating public-private and civil strategic partnerships between organizations

NGO activists, ministers, academics and environmental philosophers all now refer to ‘citizenship’ as a key concept for understanding environmental justice and responsibility. Using contexts as diverse as Southern Spain, the borderlands of Thailand and South Africa, this book demonstrates how ecological citizenship provides the key link between them through processes of civic engagement.

Citation

Mark J. Smith and Piya Pangsapa, Environment and Citizenship: Integrating Justice, Responsibility and Civic Engagement (Zed Books, 2008)

Book

Environment and Citizenship: Integrating Justice, Responsibility and Civic Engagement

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail