Tag Archives: Russia

Energy and the Transformation of International Relations (A. Wenger, et al)

Editor(s)

Andreas Wenger, Robert W. Orttung and Jeronim Perovic

Keywords

Energy, changing markets, energy use patterns, energy security, oil supplies, Middle East, Russia, Latin America, Africa, United States, Europe, China, India, Cooperative Framework

Abstract

Comprehensive overview of global energy producers and consumers, with a chapter on each major producer and consumer. Shows how energy affects the prospects for conflict and cooperation around the world.
Case studies and conclusions show how different countries are reacting to evolving international energy conditions. Contributes to comparative political studies, international relations, and security studies

With energy security at the top of the global agenda, this book examines the development of a new producer-consumer framework. As the era of cheap energy comes to an end, Asia’s demand for energy increases, and concerns over climate change increase, it is clear that the old framework is no longer sustainable in this new era. This book examines the evolving relations between the key producers (Middle East, Russia, Latin America, and Africa) and traditional consumers such as the US and Europe, and new consumers such as China and India as they adjust to the changing marketplace and political realities.

At the centre of the book is the key question of how dynamics in the global energy market affect the nature of international relations. It is argued that while conflict over resources is possible, there are many opportunities for international cooperation over energy resources. Although coal, oil, and gas will define energy usage for the foreseeable future, greater efficiency and alternative sources of energy will play an important role in shaping the new producer-consumer framework.

Citation

Andreas Wenger, Robert W. Orttung and Jeronim Perovic (eds), Energy and the Transformation of International Relations: Toward a New Producer-Consumer Framework(OUP/Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, Oxford 2009)

Book

Energy and the Transformation of International Relations: Toward a New Producer-Consumer Framework

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Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (D. Zillman, et al)

Editor(s)

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández

Keywords

Health, Environment, Sustainable Development, TAANSAAFL Problem, Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Lower-Carbon Future, Climate Change, Carbon Capture and Storage, Biofuels, Public International Law, South America, Clean Energy, Africa, Heavy Duty Transition Fuels, EU Law and Policy, Wind, Nuclear Power, China, Brazil, India, Mexico, Australia, Japan, Russia, US,

Abstract

Explores topical controversies over alternative energy sources including nuclear power, and over sustainability and environmental concern versus energy supply in the developing world

Regional, sectoral and technology-based analysis, and a wide variety of national perspectives demonstrate how the law can impede or advance the shift to a significantly different world energy picture
Examines the roles of public international law and international legal bodies, regional legal structures and major international nongovernmental actors
The present energy economy, with its heavy dependence on fossil fuels, is not sustainable over the medium to long term for many interconnected reasons. Climate change is now recognized as posing a serious threat. Energy and resource decisions involving the carbon fuels therefore play a large role in this threat. Fossil fuel reserves may also be running short and many of the major reserves are in politically unstable parts of the world.

Yet citizens in nations with rapidly developing economies aspire to the benefits of the modern energy economy. China and India alone have 2.4 billion potential customers for cars, industries, and electrical services. Even so, more than half of the world’s citizens still lack access to energy. Decisions involving fossil fuels are therefore a significant part of the development equation.

This volume explains how the law can impede or advance the shift to a world energy picture significantly different from that which exists today.

It first examines the factors that create the problems of the present carbon economy, including environmental concerns and development goals. It then provides international and regional legal perspectives, examining public international law, regional legal structures, the responses of international legal bodies, and the role of major international nongovernmental actors. The book then moves on to explore sectoral perspectives including the variety of renewable energy sources, new carbon fuels, nuclear power, demand controls, and energy efficiency. Finally, the authors examine how particular States are, could, or should, be adapting legally to the challenges of moving beyond the carbon economy.

Readership: Lawyers, public policy-makers, and corporate analysts in the energy and natural resources sectors, and scholars in the fields of energy and environmental law, environmental management, development economics and sustainable development.

Citation

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández (eds), Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (OUP, Oxford 2008)

Book

Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition

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