Tag Archives: renewable energy

Climate Change and Justice: Perspectives of Legal Theory (F. Ekardt)

Author(s)

Felix Ekardt

Keywords

Adaptation to Climate Change, Agriculture and Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change Convention, Climate Change and Law, Climate Law, Housing and Climate, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Development

Abstract

Climate Change and the Law is the first scholarly effort to systematically address doctrinal issues related to climate law as an emergent legal discipline. It assembles some of the most recognized experts in the field to identify relevant trends and common themes from a variety of geographic and professional perspectives.

Citation

(2013) 21 IUS Gentium 63

Paper

Climate Change and the Law

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Renewable Energy Sources: a Chance to Combat Climate Change (C. Fräss-Ehrfeld)

Author

Clarisse Fräss-Ehrfeld

Keywords

Deloitte Services, Renewable Energy, Climate Change, International Conventions Concerning the Climate Change Issue, Effects, Impacts, International Community, Adaptation, Mitigation, European Energy Policy, EU, EU Energy Security and Solidarity Action Plan, Communication of the Commission in View of Copenhagen 2009, Existing Energy Sources, Costs, Renewable Energy Sources (RES), Targets, Progress to Date, European State Aid Policy, EU Regulations, Community Guidelines on State Aid for Environmental Protection, Financing Mechanisms and Institutions, National Instruments, National Policies

Abstract

Everybody knows that climate change is one of the greatest threats facing the planet. The costs of failure to act are becoming unthinkable. Yet we know now that if developed countries agree to cut their collective emissions by 30% by 2020, annual economic growth would be trimmed by less than 0.2% – a small price to pay to avoid the potential long-term costs of climate change. Moreover, it is easy to appreciate the positive value of other benefits such as reduced air pollution, security of energy supply at predictable prices, and improved competitiveness through innovation.

Now, for the growing number of enterprises and investors committed to combating climate change with renewable energy technologies, here at last is a minutely detailed analysis of the opportunities and obstacles involved in developing a coherent and effective business strategy. Beginning with an in-depth and up-to-date overview of what we know about the climate change issue, the author goes on to an extensive survey of Renewable Energy Sources (RES), both existing and under development. Recognizing that, in the current state of global awareness, the European Union has taken by far the largest steps in tackling the enormous problems entailed by climate change, she explores in unprecedented detail the various “green” energy incentives and support schemes available under various programs available both at EU level and in each of the 27 Member States.

Both project developers and investors will find out here exactly how to:

  • significantly reduce the main market entry barrier – high costs;
  • exploit synergies and avoid negative spillover effects through coordinated action;
  • draw on all available policy levers, fiscal policies, structural and financial market reforms and external action;
  • ensure full coherence between immediate actions and the EU’s medium- to longer term objectives;
  • take full account of the global nature of the problem and shape the EU’s contribution to international responses;
  • comply with technical provisions for monitoring, reporting and verification; and
  • discern investment trends in the RES markets.
  • Providing both knowledge of the industry and of relevant investment instruments, Renewable Energy Sources will serve as a powerful liaison between project developers and investors in the renewable energy market. Interested companies and their counsel will find here a ready reference for information on sources of equity/venture capital, detailed knowledge of available subsidies, business expansion strategies, viable investment options, and advantageous networks.

Citation

Clarisse Fräss-Ehrfeld, Renewable Energy Sources: a Chance to Combat Climate Change (Kluwer Law, The Netherlands 2009)

Book

Renewable Energy Sources: a Chance to Combat Climate Change

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Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (D. Zillman, et al)

Editor(s)

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández

Keywords

Health, Environment, Sustainable Development, TAANSAAFL Problem, Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Lower-Carbon Future, Climate Change, Carbon Capture and Storage, Biofuels, Public International Law, South America, Clean Energy, Africa, Heavy Duty Transition Fuels, EU Law and Policy, Wind, Nuclear Power, China, Brazil, India, Mexico, Australia, Japan, Russia, US,

Abstract

Explores topical controversies over alternative energy sources including nuclear power, and over sustainability and environmental concern versus energy supply in the developing world

Regional, sectoral and technology-based analysis, and a wide variety of national perspectives demonstrate how the law can impede or advance the shift to a significantly different world energy picture
Examines the roles of public international law and international legal bodies, regional legal structures and major international nongovernmental actors
The present energy economy, with its heavy dependence on fossil fuels, is not sustainable over the medium to long term for many interconnected reasons. Climate change is now recognized as posing a serious threat. Energy and resource decisions involving the carbon fuels therefore play a large role in this threat. Fossil fuel reserves may also be running short and many of the major reserves are in politically unstable parts of the world.

Yet citizens in nations with rapidly developing economies aspire to the benefits of the modern energy economy. China and India alone have 2.4 billion potential customers for cars, industries, and electrical services. Even so, more than half of the world’s citizens still lack access to energy. Decisions involving fossil fuels are therefore a significant part of the development equation.

This volume explains how the law can impede or advance the shift to a world energy picture significantly different from that which exists today.

It first examines the factors that create the problems of the present carbon economy, including environmental concerns and development goals. It then provides international and regional legal perspectives, examining public international law, regional legal structures, the responses of international legal bodies, and the role of major international nongovernmental actors. The book then moves on to explore sectoral perspectives including the variety of renewable energy sources, new carbon fuels, nuclear power, demand controls, and energy efficiency. Finally, the authors examine how particular States are, could, or should, be adapting legally to the challenges of moving beyond the carbon economy.

Readership: Lawyers, public policy-makers, and corporate analysts in the energy and natural resources sectors, and scholars in the fields of energy and environmental law, environmental management, development economics and sustainable development.

Citation

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández (eds), Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (OUP, Oxford 2008)

Book

Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition

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The European Commission 2008 Directive Proposal on Biofuels (F. Pelsy)

Author

Florent Pelsy

Keywords

Biofuels, certification, climate change, environmental criteria, European Community, food insecurity, precautionary principle, renewable energy, sustainable development, WTO

Abstract

This article focuses on the 2008 Directive Proposal of the European Commission on biofuels. The development of biofuels as a renewable energy source has been perceived as a priority by the European Union. Indeed biofuels are approached by the EU as a new ‘win-win’ solution that could both reduce emission of greenhouses gases in the context of climate change and improve energy security while not affecting the European economic growth. The 2008 Directive Proposal of the Commission requires an objective of ten per cent of biofuels in the EU Transport in 2020. In order to qualify within that target biofuels shall be produced according to certain environmental criteria. This article points out the tremendous negative impacts on food security and the environment both in the developed and in the developing world of such a large-scale consumption of biofuels. It then considers that the environmental criteria required by the Directive Proposal of the Commission are not likely to be the adequate response to tackle the negative consequences of the implementation of that ten per cent target. It, thus, suggests the application of the precautionary principle as sketched out by the European Court of Justice in the case Pfizer – Alpharma to that ten per cent target and a moratorium on biofuels at the EU level.

Citation

(2008) 4(2) Law, Environment and Development Journal 119

Paper

The European Commission 2008 Directive Proposal on Biofuels

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