Tag Archives: Neo-colonialism

Climate change and REDD+: property as a prism for conceiving Indigenous peoples’ engagement (K. Birrell, L. Godden and M. Tehan)

Author(s)

Kathleen Birrell and Lee Godden and Maureen Tehan

Keywords

Carbon markets, Indigenous peoples, forest subsistence, REDD+, co-option, neo-colonialism, competing property conceptions

Abstract

The rapid emergence of carbon markets internationally, and rising concerns about the impact of such schemes on Indigenous and local community interests, rights and traditional knowledge, present a strong need to examine legal regulation, protection and promotion of equitable outcomes for the effective engagement of Indigenous peoples and local forest subsistence communities in climate change mitigation. This is particularly so in the context of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD and REDD+ as it later became known) – a scheme that will significantly affect the ‘property’ rights and interests of such communities. The pace and enthusiasm for investment in, and implementation of, this scheme necessitate scrutiny of the foreseeable consequences at a local level, including the potential of this global project to act as a form of neo-colonialism, co-opting Indigenous and local community interests where the value of the carbon ‘offset’ may not accrue to local inhabitants of the forested areas. Accordingly, this paper seeks to present a series of fundamental questions raised by the programme, particularly in respect of differing conceptions of property, as it uniquely relates to and impacts upon Indigenous peoples.

Citation

(2012) 3/2 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 196-216

Paper

Climate change and REDD+: property as a prism for conceiving Indigenous peoples’ engagement

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Environmental Justice in the New Millennium (F.C. Steady)

Author

Filomina Chioma Steady

Keywords

Environmental Justice, Cross-Culturally, Gendered Dimensions, Neo-colonialism, Internal Colonialism, Chronic Environmental Injustice, Water, Hazardous Waste, Nuclear Energy, Health, South Africa, Race, Class, Hurricane Katrina, Landowners

Abstract

Environmental Justice is one of the most important human rights challenge today. It combats the targeting people of color and poor people for the burdens of environmental degradation and pollution. Case studies from various parts of the world explore themes that include: historical and theoretical perspectives on Environmental Justice; the persistence of models of domination, exploitation and discrimination; gender implications of environmental degradation; violence and militarization; corporate globalization, climate change and the tragedy of Katrina. The Environmental Justice Movement represents a combination of academic, political, legal and grass-roots activism against environmental and social injustices.

Citation

Filomina Chioma Steady (ed), Environmental Justice in the New Millennium: Global Perspectives on Race, Ethnicity, and Human Rights (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009)

Paper

Environmental Justice in the New Millennium: Global Perspectives on Race, Ethnicity, and Human Rights

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