Tag Archives: Mexico

Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (D. Zillman, et al)

Editor(s)

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández

Keywords

Health, Environment, Sustainable Development, TAANSAAFL Problem, Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Lower-Carbon Future, Climate Change, Carbon Capture and Storage, Biofuels, Public International Law, South America, Clean Energy, Africa, Heavy Duty Transition Fuels, EU Law and Policy, Wind, Nuclear Power, China, Brazil, India, Mexico, Australia, Japan, Russia, US,

Abstract

Explores topical controversies over alternative energy sources including nuclear power, and over sustainability and environmental concern versus energy supply in the developing world

Regional, sectoral and technology-based analysis, and a wide variety of national perspectives demonstrate how the law can impede or advance the shift to a significantly different world energy picture
Examines the roles of public international law and international legal bodies, regional legal structures and major international nongovernmental actors
The present energy economy, with its heavy dependence on fossil fuels, is not sustainable over the medium to long term for many interconnected reasons. Climate change is now recognized as posing a serious threat. Energy and resource decisions involving the carbon fuels therefore play a large role in this threat. Fossil fuel reserves may also be running short and many of the major reserves are in politically unstable parts of the world.

Yet citizens in nations with rapidly developing economies aspire to the benefits of the modern energy economy. China and India alone have 2.4 billion potential customers for cars, industries, and electrical services. Even so, more than half of the world’s citizens still lack access to energy. Decisions involving fossil fuels are therefore a significant part of the development equation.

This volume explains how the law can impede or advance the shift to a world energy picture significantly different from that which exists today.

It first examines the factors that create the problems of the present carbon economy, including environmental concerns and development goals. It then provides international and regional legal perspectives, examining public international law, regional legal structures, the responses of international legal bodies, and the role of major international nongovernmental actors. The book then moves on to explore sectoral perspectives including the variety of renewable energy sources, new carbon fuels, nuclear power, demand controls, and energy efficiency. Finally, the authors examine how particular States are, could, or should, be adapting legally to the challenges of moving beyond the carbon economy.

Readership: Lawyers, public policy-makers, and corporate analysts in the energy and natural resources sectors, and scholars in the fields of energy and environmental law, environmental management, development economics and sustainable development.

Citation

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández (eds), Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (OUP, Oxford 2008)

Book

Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition

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US border wall: breaching civil liberties and minority rights (Z. Akhtar)

Author

Zia Akhtar

Keywords

Border controls; Constitutional rights; Environmental protection; Human rights; Immigration policy; Indigenous peoples; International law; Mexico; United States

Abstract

Examines the implications of the wall and other security measures at the US-Mexico border for: (1) immigrant human rights; (2) US relations with Indian tribes; (3) US compliance with international refugee law; and (4) environmental protection.

Citation

(2010) 15(2) Coventry Law Journal 19-33

Paper

US border wall: breaching civil liberties and minority rights

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Maize diversity, rural development policy, and farmers’ practices (A. Keleman, et al)

Author(s)

Alder Keleman (International Maize & Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico)
J. Hellin (International Maize & Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico)
M.R. Bellon (Bioversity International, Rome, Italy)

Keywords

Chiapas, Mexico, agrobiodiversity, maize, focus groups, NAFTA

Abstract

Maize diversity is important to the livelihoods of millions of farmers in Mexico, the crop’s centre of origin; to maize breeders seeking new genetic material; and to producers and consumers worldwide. Key social processes that determine maize diversity include historic and cultural emphases on maize as a primary crop; land-use practices encompassing heterogeneous agro-ecological conditions; farmers’ seed-saving practices; farmer selection of useful traits; and farmer seed exchange and purchasing networks. We consider the impacts of recent agricultural and rural development policies on these processes. We focus on La Frailesca, a commercial and semi-subsistence maize-growing region in southern Mexico. Qualitative data were collected via focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews, and participant observation in four villages at intervals over a 2-year period. These techniques were complemented with semi-structured interviews with local and state policymakers. Observations suggest that policies promoting market liberalisation, agricultural modernisation, and rural education have contributed to significant changes in the social processes which have historically generated maize diversity. Increasing numbers of smallholder maize producers are diversifying into alternative livelihood options, including temporary or permanent migration, and cultural and economic emphases on maize production are changing. Changes in La Frailesca raise important questions about the fate of maize genetic diversity as the Mexican agricultural sector is further realigned with the global agricultural economy.

Citation

(2009) 175 Geographical Journal 52-70

Paper

Maize diversity, rural development policy, and farmers’ practices: lessons from Chiapas, Mexico

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