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In the Way of Development: Indigenous Peoples, Life Projects and Globalization (M. Blaser, et al)

Editor(s)

Mario Blaser, Harvey A. Feit and Glenn McRae

Keywords

Indigenous Peoples, Development, Paraguayan Indigenism, Yshiro People‘s Life Projects, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Sustainable Development, Animal Partners, Grassroots Transnationalism, Great Whale Campaign, States, Markets, Civil Society, Canada, Native/Non-Native Alliances, Mining Corporations, Chilean Economic Expansion, Mega-Development Project, Mapuche Territories, Hydroelectric Development, Bío-Bío River, Anthropology and Human Rights, Advocacy, Ecological Ethnicities, Russian Far East, Conflicting Discourses, Property, Governance, Indigenous North, Resistance, Determination, Perseverance

Abstract

A collaboration between indigenous leaders, social activists and scholars from a wide range of disciplines, In the Way of Development explores the current situation of indigenous peoples enmeshed in the remorseless expansion of the modern economy.

The volume assembles a rich diversity of statements, case studies and wider thematic explorations all starting with indigenous peoples as actors, not victims. The accounts come primarily from North America, but include also studies from South America, and the former Soviet Union.

In the Way of Development shows how the boundaries between indigenous peoples‘ organizations, civil society, the state, markets, development and the environment are ambiguous and constantly changing. This fact makes local political agency possible, but also, ironically, opens the possibility of undermining it.

The volume presents these complex, power-laden, often contradictory features of indigenous agency and relationships. It shows how peoples do not just resist or react to the pressures of market and state, but also sustain ‘life projects‘ of their own.

Citation

Mario Blaser, Harvey A. Feit and Glenn McRae (eds), In the Way of Development: Indigenous Peoples, Life Projects and Globalization (Zed Books, 2004)

Book

In the Way of Development: Indigenous Peoples, Life Projects and Globalization

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The Shadows of Consumption: Consequences for the Global Environment (P. Dauvergne)

Author

Peter Dauvergne

Keywords

Global Political Economy, Consumption, Globalization, Emissions, Profits, Risks, Africa, Globalization, Ozone Layer, Ecology, Sustainable Beef, Activism, Markets, Globalizing Markets, Environmentalism, World Order, Balanced Consumption

Abstract

The Shadows of Consumption gives a hard-hitting diagnosis: many of the earth’s ecosystems and billions of its people are at risk from the consequences of rising consumption. Products ranging from cars to hamburgers offer conveniences and pleasures; but, as Peter Dauvergne makes clear, global political and economic processes displace the real costs of consumer goods into distant ecosystems, communities, and timelines, tipping into crisis people and places without the power to resist.

In The Shadows of Consumption, Peter Dauvergne maps the costs of consumption that remain hidden in the shadows cast by globalized corporations, trade, and finance. He traces the environmental consequences of five commodities: automobiles, gasoline, refrigerators, beef, and harp seals. In these fascinating histories we learn, for example, that American officials ignored warnings about the dangers of lead in gasoline in the 1920s; why China is now a leading producer of CFC-free refrigerators; and how activists were able to stop Canada ‘s commercial seal hunt in the 1980s (but are unable to do so now).

Dauvergne’s innovative analysis allows us to see why so many efforts to manage the global environment are failing even as environmentalism is slowly strengthening. He proposes a guiding principle of “balanced consumption” for both consumers and corporations. We know that we can make things better by driving a fuel-efficient car, eating locally grown food, and buying energy-efficient appliances; but these improvements are incremental, local, and insufficient. More crucial than our individual efforts to reuse and recycle will be reforms in the global political economy to reduce the inequalities of consumption and correct the imbalance between growing economies and environmental sustainability.

Citation

Peter Dauvergne, The Shadows of Consumption: Consequences for the Global Environment (MIT Press , USA 2008)

Book

The Shadows of Consumption: Consequences for the Global Environment

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