Tag Archives: Japan

Environmentalism in periods of rapid societal transformation: the legacy…(B.Barrett)

Author

Brendan F. D. Barrett

Keywords

Sustainability; human and natural systems; complexity; population; Industrial Revolution; Meiji Restoration; rural societies; industrialisation; pollution; urban; social movements; human rights.

Abstract

The pursuit of environmental sustainability implies dramatic transformation of modern society in order to bring about a more benign interaction between human and natural systems. It is now widely recognized that this paradigm shift would require the restructuring of society in order to deal with increasingly complex environmental problems and the current high rates at which natural resources are being depleted. These changes need to be made quickly, say within the next 50 years, since the worlds population in 2050 would be between 10 and 12 billion.
Examples of breathtakingly rapid societal change in the past include the Industrial Revolution in the United Kingdom and the Meiji Restoration in Japan. The direction of change, however, was a move away from the relatively close (though not necessarily harmonious) relationship between humans and nature found in rural societies to one characterized by distance and isolation in the new factories and industrial towns. Meanwhile, pollution problems, which have always been associated with urbanity, became more widespread and intensified.
Related to this, the notions of environmentalism began to take shape in both countries during these periods. In the United Kingdom, the roots of environmentalism are intertwined with the Romantic Movement that sought to conserve the natural beauty of the land and cultural heritage of the nation. In Japan, the Meiji Restoration witnessed the emergence of new social movements backed by intellectuals fighting for popular rights and against development.

Citation

(1999) 7(4) Sustainable Development, 178-190.

Paper

Environmentalism in periods of rapid societal transformation: the legacy of the Industrial Revolution in the United Kingdom and the Meiji Restoration in Japan.

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Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (D. Zillman, et al)

Editor(s)

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández

Keywords

Health, Environment, Sustainable Development, TAANSAAFL Problem, Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Lower-Carbon Future, Climate Change, Carbon Capture and Storage, Biofuels, Public International Law, South America, Clean Energy, Africa, Heavy Duty Transition Fuels, EU Law and Policy, Wind, Nuclear Power, China, Brazil, India, Mexico, Australia, Japan, Russia, US,

Abstract

Explores topical controversies over alternative energy sources including nuclear power, and over sustainability and environmental concern versus energy supply in the developing world

Regional, sectoral and technology-based analysis, and a wide variety of national perspectives demonstrate how the law can impede or advance the shift to a significantly different world energy picture
Examines the roles of public international law and international legal bodies, regional legal structures and major international nongovernmental actors
The present energy economy, with its heavy dependence on fossil fuels, is not sustainable over the medium to long term for many interconnected reasons. Climate change is now recognized as posing a serious threat. Energy and resource decisions involving the carbon fuels therefore play a large role in this threat. Fossil fuel reserves may also be running short and many of the major reserves are in politically unstable parts of the world.

Yet citizens in nations with rapidly developing economies aspire to the benefits of the modern energy economy. China and India alone have 2.4 billion potential customers for cars, industries, and electrical services. Even so, more than half of the world’s citizens still lack access to energy. Decisions involving fossil fuels are therefore a significant part of the development equation.

This volume explains how the law can impede or advance the shift to a world energy picture significantly different from that which exists today.

It first examines the factors that create the problems of the present carbon economy, including environmental concerns and development goals. It then provides international and regional legal perspectives, examining public international law, regional legal structures, the responses of international legal bodies, and the role of major international nongovernmental actors. The book then moves on to explore sectoral perspectives including the variety of renewable energy sources, new carbon fuels, nuclear power, demand controls, and energy efficiency. Finally, the authors examine how particular States are, could, or should, be adapting legally to the challenges of moving beyond the carbon economy.

Readership: Lawyers, public policy-makers, and corporate analysts in the energy and natural resources sectors, and scholars in the fields of energy and environmental law, environmental management, development economics and sustainable development.

Citation

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández (eds), Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (OUP, Oxford 2008)

Book

Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition

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