Tag Archives: impact

The Global Compact, Environmental Principles, and Change in International Environmental Politics (A. Akhtarkhavari)

Author

Afshin Akhtarkhavari ( Griffith Law School )

Keywords

Environmental principles, role, function, international level, change, impact, Global Compact, international law and politics

Abstract

Unlike rules, international lawyers commonly ignore the potential that environmental principles have to create change in international law and politics. Transnational actors do not easily conform to abstract and open-textured environmental principles because they do not prescribe a specific way of behaving and compliance with them is difficult to enforce. The Global Compact initiative of the United Nations relies on principles to create a regime applying to transnational corporations. It is structured around encouraging corporations to socially learn rather than to comply with norms. In this context environmental principles within the Global Compact have the potential to create significant change in international politics but one that is better assessed in terms of how they frame ideas during the interactions of participants and stakeholders within the regime. This interplay between environmental principles and the social influence of ideas is an important steering mechanism for the kind of learning that potentially is taking place within the Global Compact. It also distinguishes the Global Compact from other attempts to consider the role of internationally developed voluntary codes as a common frame for multinational corporations to self-regulate themselves. Notably, it highlights an important role and function for environmental principles, which are often discounted in their potential to contribute to change at the international level.

Citation

(2010) 38 Denver Journal of International Law and Policy 277

Paper

The Global Compact, Environmental Principles, and Change in International Environmental Politics

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Citizen Participation in the Environmental Impact Assessment Process in Guyana : Reality or Fallacy? (M.L. Bynoe)

Author

Mark Lancelot Bynoe

Keywords

Assessment, citizen, development, environmental, Guyana, impact, law, participation, permit, plan

Abstract

Since June 1996, Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) have become mandatory in Guyana for all projects anticipated to have significant impacts on the environment. Furthermore, the law, i.e. the Environmental Protection Act, that brought this stipulation into being also identifies formal channels by which citizens are expected to participate from project conception through to the resolution of conflicts. However, while the Act is explicit with regards to citizen participation, the modalities by which they can participate effectively have been operating less than optimally.

Thus, this paper seeks to examine what the law states about citizen participation and to take a critical look at the participation process in Guyana. It utilises mainly secondary sources and the authors experience in the field to determine that a lack of innovation in the participation process is conspicuously absent. Furthermore, the participation process is conducted differently for most development vis-à-vis investment projects.

The paper therefore posits as one of its main recommendations, the need for a structured citizen participation plan to improve the involvement of the stakeholders, and modus operandi that are culturally appropriate that will allow for more substantive feedback and less cynicism of the process.

Citation

(2006) 2(1) Law, Environment and Development Journal 34

Paper

Citizen Participation in the Environmental Impact Assessment Process in Guyana : Reality or Fallacy?

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Unmasking Chinese Business Enterprises: Using Information Disclosure Laws to Enhance Public Participation …(T. Riley and C. Huiyan)

Author(s)

Timothy Riley and Cai Huiyan

Keywords

China, access to environmental information, corporate disclosure, Chinese businesses, government decisions, corporate decisions, public participation, impact, local communities, ecosystems

Abstract

This article argues that the existing state of corporate disclosure law and regulations in China is insufficient to allow the Chinese public adequate access to environmental information. As a result, citizens are unable to participate properly in crucial government and corporate decisions that impact local communities and ecosystems.

Citation

(2009) 33 Harvard Environmental Law Review 177

Paper

Unmasking Chinese Business Enterprises: Using Information Disclosure Laws to Enhance Public Participation in Corporate Environmental Decision Making

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In Pursuit of Environmental Human Rights: Commentary on the Draft Declaration… (N.A.F. Popovic)

Author

Neil A.F. Popovic

Keywords

Environmental human rights, quality of life, impact, environment, human consequences, environmental degradation, human society, natural environment

Abstract

When the environment suffers, people suffer; when the suffering implicates human rights, relevant norms and procedures should apply. This, in turn, raises the question of what the relevant norms and procedures are and also whether and how those norms and procedures might contribute to the protection of human rights and the environment. This article probes these issues. The remainder of the introduction fills in the background for the ensuing examination of environmental human rights— that is, the elements of human rights that are implicated by environmental problems. The introduction first recounts a U.N. study of the linkage between human rights and the environment, then introduces the 1994 Draft Declaration of Principles on Human Rights and the Environment (Draft Declaration), and lastly, outlines the framework for legal analysis of the principles in the Draft Declaration.

Citation

(1996) 27 Columbia Human Rights Law Review 487

Paper

In Pursuit of Environmental Human Rights: Commentary on the Draft Declaration of Principles on Human Rights and the Environment

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