Tag Archives: greenpeace

Eco-justice: linking human rights and the environment (A. Sachs and JA Peterson)

Author/s

A Sachs and JA Peterson

Keywords

Grassroots movement, environment, human rights, environmental information, confrontations, dumping, Greenpeace, Amnesty International, environmental justice

Abstract

This Worldwatch report affirms that the grassroots movement to improve the environment and human rights should be operable at the regional and international levels. Grassroots groups have demonstrated the success of empowering people and of the protection of civil liberties in environmental preservation. The author’s stance is that “potential polluters and profligate consumers” would not be able to treat vulnerable populations as expendable and would be forced to seek other alternatives to polluting activities and overconsumption, under certain conditions. All vulnerable members of society must have access to environmental information, exercise their rights of free speech, and have a role in determining their access to resources. Prevention is considered less costly by reducing production of hazardous wastes than by increasing the number of dump sites. The preventive lesson learned from human rights activists is that confrontation is necessary between the “dumpers and the dumped on” in order to secure the health and well-being of future generations. Although countries may never agree on a definition of environmental justice, there is global agreement on protecting the basic human rights that make achieving environmental justice possible. Justice is viewed as unattainable without citizen participation in key decisions. The environmental movement has been successful in development of scientific solutions to environmental degradation. Joining forces with human rights activists gives impetus to the movement to get environmental reforms implemented. Irresponsibility concerning protection of the environment is expected to stop when the elites themselves become aware that all humankind is affected by global warming and the survival of all mankind is at stake. This short volume addresses the following topics: how Greenpeace and Amnesty International are learning from each other; the human rights focus on individuals; environmental issues that cross national borders; a human rights framework for sustainable development; and environmental justice.

Citation

Washington, D.C., Worldwatch Institute, 1995 Dec. 68 (Worldwatch Paper 127)

Publication

Eco-justice: linking human rights and the environment.

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Diamond: A Struggle for Environmental Justice in Louisiana’s Chemical Corridor (S. Lerner)

Author

Steve Lerner

Keywords

Environmental justice, civil rights, chemical toxins, corporate accountability

Abstract

Issues of environmental justice and civil rights come to the fore in this fine account of a Louisiana community’s battle with its petrochemical company neighbors. Drawing heavily on interviews with residents and local activists, Lerner (Eco-Pioneers) chronicles how the people of Diamond, an African-American subdivision sandwiched between a Shell chemical plant and a Motiva oil refinery in the town of Norco, lobbied Shell (which also owns Motiva) to pay for their relocation after decades of exposure to the plants’ toxic emissions. Led by Margie Richards and her Concerned Citizens of Norco, Diamond residents argued that the Shell plants’ pollution caused a variety of problems, including kidney and nervous-system damage and lung cancer, while their white neighbors, who lived further from the plants’ shadow, tended to dismiss such claims. Lerner charts the growth of a grassroots, community drive to get Shell to recognize its impact on Diamond, the movement’s expansion to encompass assistance from national organizations such as Greenpeace and the Sierra Club and its ultimate success in convincing Shell to pay for the relocation of many Diamond residents (though Shell did so without acknowledging that its plants caused health problems). Lerner does an excellent job of explaining concisely both the scientific and the legal issues involved, never slowing down or oversimplifying a compelling and complicated story.

Citation

Steve Lerner, Diamond: A Struggle for Environmental Justice in Louisiana’s Chemical Corridor (MIT Press, USA 2005)

Book

Diamond: A Struggle for Environmental Justice in Louisiana ’s Chemical Corridor

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