Tag Archives: green economy

Payment for ‘ecosystem services’ and the ‘green economy’: green-washing or something new? (K. Wilkinson)

Author

Kate Wilkinson

Keywords

ecofeminism, green economy, payment for ecosystem services, ecosystems, environment, capitalism, free market, economics, REDDES, REDD+, UNFCCC, ITTO, forests, natural resources, gender, participation

Abstract

Using an ecofeminist critical analysis, this paper examines the extent to which two forest-related ‘payments for ecosystem services’ (PES) schemes maintain a mainstream anti-nature and exploitative conceptualization of human/nature relationships. It does so by integrating various ecofeminist themes to analyse the two PES schemes and to assess the extent to which they can protect women and nature while marketizing and commodifying the environment. The author examines the justifications for integrating PES into a green economy, including the proposed benefits resulting from the implementation of PES, and safeguards ensuring the inclusion and participation of local communities. The author concludes that an ecofeminist examination highlights the inherently exploitative nature of PES and its continuation of the currently exploitative free market paradigm.

Citation

(2014) 5/2 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 168-191

Paper

Payment for ‘ecosystem services’ and the ‘green economy’: green-washing or something new?

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Rio+20: sustainable injustice in a time of crises (S. Adelman)

Author

Sam Adelman

Keywords

sustainable development, green economy, neoliberalism, coloniality, ecology of knowledges, indigenous knowledge, climate justice

Abstract

This article argues that Rio+20 failed because it replicated the failings of sustainable development in the form of green economy. Against a backdrop of discrete but overlapping crises, including the global economic crisis, climate change and a growing crisis of food insecurity, the final text seemed oblivious to the slow wearing out of neoliberalism, dogmatically insisting on the panacea of market-based solutions to climate change and environmental destruction. 1 As such, the text symbolizes the epistemological crisis of technoscientific Eurocentric rationality. Using Walter Mignolo’s concept of coloniality and Boaventura de Sousa Santos’s call for the cultivation of an ecology of knowledges, this article examines the transformative potential of subaltern forms of jurisprudence, such as the People’s Agreement on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth. It argues that a significant epistemological shift is required to enable humanity to confront the injustices perpetuated by the vision embodied in the Rio+20 final document.

Citation

(2013) 4/1 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 6-31

Paper

Rio+20: sustainable injustice in a time of crises

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