Tag Archives: globalisation

Indigenous Peoples and the Environment: Convergence from a Nordic Perspective (L. Watters)

Author

Lawrence Watters

Keywords

indigenous rights, environment, legal systems, globalisation, internationalization, Sami, sovereignty

Abstract

Part I of the article introduces the larger picture and the process of transition in which indigenous peoples like the Sami are found. The discussion focuses on both the convergence of legal systems generally which influence the protection of indigenous peoples in international and domestic law and the concomitant impacts related to the concentration of new forces from trade, technology and communications, or, in a word, globalization. These dynamics, in concert with the ‘internationalization’ of the environment, have special consequences for indigenous peoples.

Part II considers the Sami heritage, prior to contemporary conflicts. The evolution of their status is highlighted with developments
in the law at the domestic level. Part III moves from the past, considering the topography of the protection for indigenous
peoples like the Sami in international conventions, emphasizing the emerging, shared perspective of states toward the special status
of indigenous peoples. This includes the process of change in traditional notions of sovereignity as states recognize new imperatives on behalf of the environment, culture and human rights. Part IV shifts from consideration of the larger framework to its
contemporary implementation in Norway concerning the Sami, natural resources and the environment. Part V examines the outcome of this process in a preliminary critique, assessing the implementation of the principles and standards for the protection of the Sami as well as the next stage in the resolution of issues relating to governance within the context of sovereignity and
self-determination.

Citation

(2002) UCLA Journal of Environmental Law and Policy 20 pp. 237-304

Paper

Indigenous Peoples and the Environment: Convergence from a Nordic Perspective

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The Quest for Environmental Justice: Human Rights and the Politics of Pollution (Robert D Bullard)

Author

Robert D Bullard

Keywords

Environmental injustice, environmental justice, human rights, abuses, grassroots, globalisation, environmental racism

Abstract

In 1994, Sierra Club Books was proud to publish Dr. Robert D. Bullard’s “Unequal Protection: Environmental Justice and Communities of Color”, a collection of essays contributed by some of the leading participants in the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit, which focused attention on ‘environmental racism’ – racial discrimination in environmental policymaking and the enforcement of environmental protection laws and regulations. Now, picking up where that groundbreaking anthology left off, Dr. Bullard has assembled a new collection of essays that capture the voices of frontline warriors who are battling environmental injustice and human rights abuses at the grassroots level around the world and challenging government and industry policies and globalization trends that place people of color and the poor at special risk. Part I presents an overview of the early environmental justice movement and highlights key leadership roles assumed by women activists. Part II examines the lives of people living in ‘sacrifice zones’ – toxic corridors (such as Louisiana’s infamous ‘Cancer Alley’) where high concentrations of polluting industries are found. Part III explores land use, land rights, resource extraction, and sustainable development conflicts, including Chicano struggles in America’s Southwest. Part IV examines human rights and global justice issues, including an analysis of South Africa’s legacy of environmental racism and the corruption and continuing violence plaguing the oil-rich Niger delta. Together, the diverse contributors to this much-anticipated follow-up anthology present an inspiring and illuminating picture of the environmental justice movement in the first decade of the twenty-first century.

Citation

Robert D Bullard, The Quest for Environmental Justice: Human Rights and the Politics of Pollution (San Francisco, Sierra Club Books, 2005)

Publication

The Quest for Environmental Justice: Human Rights and the Politics of Pollution

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Liberal Theory, Human Rights and Water-Justice: Back to Square One? (R. D’Souza)

Author

Radha D’Souza

Keywords

Right to water, Human Rights, Global Justice Movements, Globalisation, Liberal Theory, Left ideology

Abstract

In the wake of the Fukuyama’s ‘end of history’: liberal theory’s triumph over its soviet/communist other, and the subsequent march of ‘globalisation’ and the ascendancy of neo-liberal ideology, this article interrogates the theoretical developments on the ‘Left’, the academic and activist led critiques of liberal triumphalism, by analysing the demands for recognition of waterrights as human rights particularly in regard to the Global Justice Movements that arose from disenchantment with globalisation and neo-liberal ideology. In the context of water-justice and human rights, the article investigates the substantial underpinnings of both liberal theory and the languages of the ‘Left’ tradition in regard to the development of the human right to water to reveal the shared foundations that divorce them both from the geo-historical terrain of emancipatory politics today.

Citation

(2008) Law, Social Justice & Global Development Journal / University of Westminster School od Law Research Paper No. 09-10

Paper

Liberal Theory, Human Rights and Water-Justice: Back to Square One?

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Environmental Justice and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples – publication review (J. Ruru)

Author

Jacinta Ruru

Keywords

Ecological Integrity, environment, human rights, climate change, global warming,  globalisation, vulnerability, environmental protection, communities, rights of indigenous peoples.

Abstract

Westra, in this book, brings to the fore the horrors of ‘biological genocide’ that western developed countries have sought to perform on environments that indigenous peoples rely on for their survival. Nuclear testing and chemical spills on indigenous lands are all stories that are told in this book. Westra contends that the eco-footprint of western developed countries is a direct attack on both the right to survival and the right to self-determination of indigenous populations. Her solution, labelled the ‘biological/ecological integrity model’, she argues, is the best possible antidote against eco-footprint crime. She explains: ‘If the rights of indigenous peoples are based, first, on their rights to biological integrity and natural function; and second, these rights cannot be separated from the protection of the ecological integrity of their lands; then third, entrenching such rights would limit the freedom of Western industrial operations to commit crimes’

Citation

(2009) 21(2) Journal of Environmental Law, 385-387.

Paper

Environmental Justice & the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. International & Domestic Legal Perspectives.

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Vulnerability and globalisation: mediating impacts on society (P. Kirby)

Author

Peadar Kirby

Keywords

Vulnerability, globalisation, resilience, human rights, environment

Abstract

This article introduces the concept of vulnerability and discusses its utility for the identification of the impacts upon society, particularly upon human rights and the environment, of the multiple processes that we label ‘globalisation’. The author argues that vulnerability, an essentially two-sided concept, is intimately informed by the notion of ‘resilience’ – a principle well able to guide practical policy and political responses to vulnerability. The author contends that vulnerability impacts society, in significant part, through globalisation – or, in more precise terms – that globalisation deepens vulnerability while diminishing, in many cases, the resilience required to adapt to or mitigate vulnerability. These contentions are supported, in part, by reflections drawn from two case studies, one illustrative of the link between globalisation and vulnerability, the other revealing the ways in which vulnerability can be contested or mitigated. The author’s examination suggests that the concept of vulnerability usefully focuses attention on the key ways in which globalisation impacts upon society, including human rights and the environment, while the concept of resilience has particular utility for the development of responses, offering a rich source of guidance for policies and actions aimed at responding to the complexities of vulnerability in a globalised world.

Citation

(2011) 2(1) Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 86-105

Paper

Vulnerability and globalisation: mediating impacts on society

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