Tag Archives: gender

Payment for ‘ecosystem services’ and the ‘green economy’: green-washing or something new? (K. Wilkinson)

Author

Kate Wilkinson

Keywords

ecofeminism, green economy, payment for ecosystem services, ecosystems, environment, capitalism, free market, economics, REDDES, REDD+, UNFCCC, ITTO, forests, natural resources, gender, participation

Abstract

Using an ecofeminist critical analysis, this paper examines the extent to which two forest-related ‘payments for ecosystem services’ (PES) schemes maintain a mainstream anti-nature and exploitative conceptualization of human/nature relationships. It does so by integrating various ecofeminist themes to analyse the two PES schemes and to assess the extent to which they can protect women and nature while marketizing and commodifying the environment. The author examines the justifications for integrating PES into a green economy, including the proposed benefits resulting from the implementation of PES, and safeguards ensuring the inclusion and participation of local communities. The author concludes that an ecofeminist examination highlights the inherently exploitative nature of PES and its continuation of the currently exploitative free market paradigm.

Citation

(2014) 5/2 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 168-191

Paper

Payment for ‘ecosystem services’ and the ‘green economy’: green-washing or something new?

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Right to food; right to feed; right to be fed. The intersection of women’s rights and the right to food (P. Van Esterik)

Author

Penny Van Esterik

Keywords

Food and human rights, Food security, Gender, Policy, Women

Abstract

This paper explores conceptual and practical linkages between women and food, and argues that foodsecurity cannot be realized until women are centrally included in policy discussions about food. Women’s special relationship with food is culturally constructed and not a natural division of labor. Women’s identity and sense of self is often based on their ability to feed their families and others; food insecurity denies them this right. Thus the interpretation of food as a humanright requires that food issues be analyzed from a gender perspective. For example, the paper asks how the rights to food intersect with the rights of women and other human rights; what the policy implications of these intersecting rights are; and how their integration will contribute to the effort to view all human rights as mutually reinforcing, universal, and indivisible. The second half of the paper speculates on the significance of distinctions between the right to be fed, the right to food, and the right to feed for understanding the relation between gender and food.

Citation

(1999) 16 Agriculture and Human Values 225-232

Paper

Right to food; right to feed; right to be fed. The intersection of women’s rights and the right to food

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Water Rights & Social Justice in the Mekong Region (K. Lazarus, et al)

Editor(s)

Kate Lazarus, Nathan Badenoch, Nga Dao and Bernadette P. Resurreccion

Keywords

Water Governance, Water Rights, Mekong Region, Participation in Decision-making, Water Transfer Planning, Northeast Thailand, Local People’s Participation, Involuntary Resettlement in Vietnam, Son La Hydropower Project, Access and Equity, Competition for Water Resources, Gender, Commercialization, Fisheries-Aquaculture Divide, Nutrition, Regional Development Pathways, Food Rights, Livelihood and Environment Trade-offs, Industrial Water Use, Wastewater Management, Peri-Urban Hanoi, Climate Vulnerability, Climate Change, Socio-economic Implications, Seeking Justice

Abstract

This book reviews the issues faced by people living in the Mekong River region, in South East Asia, who are increasingly being marginalised and under-represented by the big businesses, planners and politicians – the powerful elite – influencing and deciding the trajectories of development in the region.

It also shows how complex human- and nature-induced developments in the Mekong Region are increasingly widening existing gaps in wealth, resource access and power. Fair and equal fields for decision-making and governance are needed to strengthen not only the rights but also the resilience of vulnerable groups and communities against uncertainty, particularly for climate-related changes. The authors show how vitally important it is that water governance is democratised to allow a more equitable sharing of water resources and counteract the pressures of economic growth.

Citation

Kate Lazarus, et al (eds), Water Rights and Social Justice in the Mekong Region (Earthscan, 2011)

Book

Water Rights and Social Justice in the Mekong Region

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Social Participation in Water Governance and Management (K.A. Berry and E. Mollard)

Editor(s)

Kate A. Berry and Eric Mollard

Keywords

Water management and governance, social participation, indigenous, stakeholder, gender, politics, sustainability

Abstract

Social participation in water management and governance recently became a reality in many economies and societies. Yet the dimensions in which power regulation, social equity and democracy-building are connected with participation have been only tangentially analysed for the water sector. Understanding the growing interest in social participation involves appreciating the specificity of the contemporary period within its historic and geographic contexts as well as uncovering larger political, economic and cultural trends of recent decades which frame participatory actions.

Within a wide variety of cases presented from around the world, the reader will find critical analyses of participation and an array of political ecological processes that influence water governance. Sixteen chapters from a diverse group of scholars and practitioners examine water rights definition, hydropower dam construction, urban river renewal, irrigation organizations, water development NGOs, river basin management, water policy implementation and judicial decision-making in water conflicts. Yet there are commonalities in participatory experiences across this spectrum of water issues. The book’s five sections highlight key dimensions of contemporary water management that influence, and in turn are influenced by, social participation. These sections are: participation and indigenous water governance; participation and the dynamics of gender in water management; participation and river basin governance; participation and implementation of water management and participation and the politics of water governance.

Citation

Kate A. Berry and Eric Mollard (eds), Social Participation in Water Governance and Management : Critical and Global Perspectives (Earthscan, 2009)

Book

Social Participation in Water Governance and Management: Critical and Global Perspectives

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Environment, transnational labor migration, and gender…(C. Radel, et al)

Author(s)

Claudia Radel, Birgit Schmook and Susannah McCandless

Keywords

Migration – Agriculture – Landscape – Gender – Vermont – Southern Yucatán -Environment

Abstract

Gender shapes the migration–environment association in both origin and destination communities. Using quantitative and qualitative data, we juxtapose these gender dimensions for a labor migrant-sending location of Mexico’s southern Yucatán with those for a labor migrant-receiving location in Vermont (USA). We illustrate how in the southern Yucatán, circular transnational migration alters pasture, maize and chili production in a peasant field–forest system. Gender norms condition the land-use decisions of migratory households to keep women out of agricultural fields, but in turn may be modified in unexpected ways. With men’s migration, more women assume aspects of land management, including in decision-making and supervision of hired farm labor. In comparison, in Vermont a largely male migrant labor force helps maintain an idealized, pastoral landscape with gender deeply embedded in how that labor is constructed and managed.

Citation

(2010) 32 (2/3) Population and Environment 177-197

Paper

Environment, transnational labor migration, and gender: case studies from southern Yucatán, Mexico and Vermont, USA

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail