Tag Archives: Fossil fuels

Human Rights and Global Climate Change (S. Caney)

Author(s)

Simon Caney

Keywords

human rights, fossil fuels, injustice, cosmopolitanism,  climate change, risk, uncertainty, protection, morality, time, temporal

Abstract

Is it possible and desirable to translate the basic principles underlying cosmopolitanism as a moral standard into effective global institutions. Will the ideals of inclusiveness and equal moral concern for all survive the marriage between cosmopolitanism and institutional power? What are the effects of such bureaucratisation of cosmopolitan ideals? This volume examines the strained relationship between cosmopolitanism as a moral standard and the legal institutions in which cosmopolitan norms and principles are to be implemented. Five areas of global concern are analysed: environmental protection, economic regulation, peace and security, the fight against international crimes and migration.

In this paper, the author argues that climate change jeopardizes a number of fundamental human rights.

Citation

Simon Caney, ‘Human Rights and Global Climate Change’ in: Ronald Pierik and Wouter Werner eds., Cosmopolitanism in Context: Perspectives from International Law and Political Theory (Cambridge University Press, 2010)

Paper

‘Human Rights and Global Climate Change’ in Cosmopolitanism in Context: Perspectives from International Law and Political Theory

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Power Struggle: World Energy in the Twenty-First Century (J.R. Moroney)

Author

John R. Moroney

Keywords

Climate change; Fossil fuels; Energy; Oil; Natural gas; Coal; Rewenable energies; Solar; Wind; Ethanol; Biodiesel; Energy depletion

Abstract

Professor Moroney argues that catastrophic climate change in this century can be averted without strangling the world economy and global aspirations for improved living standards, which depend on the continuing prominence of fossil fuels in the 21st century.

Can catastrophic climate change in this century be averted without strangling the world economy and global aspirations for improved living standards?both of which depend on the continuing prominence of fossil fuels in the 21st century? Power Struggle: World Energy in the Twenty-First Century argues that it can. Moroney demonstrates that energy is the cornerstone of world civilization and global economic growth by measuring the tight coupling between energy per capita and real standards of living. Fossil fuels-oil, natural gas, and coal-today account for 88 percent of world energy. The author shows that renewable energies such as solar, wind, ethanol, and biodiesel cannot be deployed to replace fossil fuels on a globally significant scale within the next 50 years. Fossil fuels, he maintains, will continue to dominate world energy for the next half-century, in spite of the coming severe depletion of world reserves of conventional oil and gas.

But since the burning of fossil fuels is the principal source of carbon dioxide emissions, which are in turn the principal source of global warming, how can catastrophic climate change be avoided? The solution to the dilemma, says Moroney, is to capture and permanently store most of the carbon dioxide emitted by the human race. Half of all human CO2 emissions originate in 8,000 electric power plants, refineries, steel mills, and other manufacturing facilities around the world. The technology is at hand to capture the CO2 emissions from these big plants and store them, permanently and harmlessly, in geological traps and the deep ocean, instead of releasing them into the atmosphere. Coal-fired power plants with near-total capture of CO2 emissions will become operational in the United States and Western Europe as early as 2012. If the world is to thread the perilous straits of economic and climate catastrophe, international cooperation and capital investment on a scale unprecedented in human history will be required. Power Struggle marshals the most important facts concerning world energy reserves: where oil, natural gas, and coal, and uranium reserves are located; how long they will last at projected rates of consumption; and why the most prosperous countries of the world will increasingly rely on oil and natural gas imports from the Middle East and Russia . Moroney shows why it is reasonable to expect that unconventional oil and gas sources such as heavy crude oil, tar sands, and oil shale will come on stream as feasible long-term substitutes for the world’s depleted reserves of conventional oil and gas.

Citation

John R. Moroney, Power Struggle: World Energy in the Twenty-First Century (Praeger, 2008)

Book

Power Struggle: World Energy in the Twenty-First Century

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Beyond Smoke & Mirrors: Climate Change & Energy in the 21st Century (B. Richter)

Author

Burton Richter ( Stanford University , USA )

Keywords

Climate, Greenhouse Earth, Climate modeling, Future, Energy, Physicists, Economists; Energy, Emissions, Action, Fossil fuels, Electricity, Pricing carbon, Efficiency, Nuclear energy, Renewables, Biofuels, US policy, World policy

Abstract

Global climate change is one of the most important issues humanity faces today. This book assesses the sensible, senseless and biased proposals for averting the potentially disastrous consequences of global warming, allowing the reader to draw their own conclusions on switching to more sustainable energy provision. Burton Richter is a Nobel Prize-winning scientist who has served on many US and international review committees on climate change and energy issues. He provides a concise overview of our knowledge and uncertainties within climate change science , discusses current energy demand and supply patterns, and the energy options available to cut emissions of greenhouse gases. Written in non-technical language, this book presents a balanced view of options for moving from our heavy reliance on fossil fuels into a much more sustainable energy system, and is accessible to a wide range of readers without scientific backgrounds – students, policymakers, and the concerned citizen.

• Dispels confusion about all the potential solutions for averting climate change impacts, presenting both the limitations and the promise of our energy production options • Assesses the good and bad proposals for moving from heavy use of fossil fuels to a more sustainable energy provision in the future • Written in an accessible language by a Nobel Prize-winning scientist

Citation

Burton Richter, Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Climate Change and Energy in the 21st Century ( CUP , USA 2010)

Book

Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Climate Change and Energy in the 21st Century

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Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Climate Change and Energy in the 21st Century (B. Richter)

Author

Burton Richter ( Stanford University , USA )

Keywords

Climate, Greenhouse Earth, Climate modeling, Future, Energy, Physicists, Economists; Energy, Emissions, Action, Fossil fuels, Electricity, Pricing carbon, Efficiency, Nuclear energy, Renewables, Biofuels, US policy, World policy

Abstract

Global climate change is one of the most important issues humanity faces today. This book assesses the sensible, senseless and biased proposals for averting the potentially disastrous consequences of global warming, allowing the reader to draw their own conclusions on switching to more sustainable energy provision. Burton Richter is a Nobel Prize-winning scientist who has served on many US and international review committees on climate change and energy issues. He provides a concise overview of our knowledge and uncertainties within climate change science , discusses current energy demand and supply patterns, and the energy options available to cut emissions of greenhouse gases. Written in non-technical language, this book presents a balanced view of options for moving from our heavy reliance on fossil fuels into a much more sustainable energy system, and is accessible to a wide range of readers without scientific backgrounds – students, policymakers, and the concerned citizen.

• Dispels confusion about all the potential solutions for averting climate change impacts, presenting both the limitations and the promise of our energy production options • Assesses the good and bad proposals for moving from heavy use of fossil fuels to a more sustainable energy provision in the future • Written in an accessible language by a Nobel Prize-winning scientist

Citation

Burton Richter, Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Climate Change and Energy in the 21st Century ( CUP , USA 2010)

Book

Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Climate Change and Energy in the 21st Century

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