Tag Archives: forced migration

Climate Change, Human Rights, and Forced Migration: Implications for International Law (S. Atapattu)

Author(s)

Sumudu Atapattu

Keywords

climate change, forced migration, human development, IPCC, greenhouse gas emissions, international law, human rights

Introduction

“Climate change has been identified as the “defining human development issue of our generation” and possibly the “biggest humanitarian and economic challenge that the developing world will have to face in the coming decades.” The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recognized unequivocally in its 4th report that global greenhouse gas emissions due to human activities have contributed to the warming of the Earth’s surface, ending years of debate on whether this is a human-made phenomenon or a natural one. […]”

Citation

(2009) 27 Wisconsin International Law Journal 607.

Paper

Climate Change, Human Rights, and Forced Migration: Implications for International Law

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Human rights and climate change (collection of articles edited by S. Humphreys)

Author

Multiple authors (collection) edited by Stephen Humphreys (forward by Mary Robinson):

Stephen Humphreys (including introduction and conclusion), Simon Caney, Dinah Shelton, Peter Newell, Sam Adelman, Philippe Cullet, Francis Seymour, Paul Hunt & Rajat Khosla, Jon Barnett, John C. Mutter & Kye Mesa Barnard.

Keywords

Environmental justice, human rights, climate change, developing countries, vulnerability, forced migration, climate harms, moral thresholds, extraterritorial responsibility, equitable utilisation of the atmosphere, corporate accountability, Kyoto protocol, equity dimensions, forests, managing risks and trade-offs, highest attainable standard of health, evolution of disasters and inequality.

Abstract

As the effects of climate change continue to be felt, appreciation of its future transformational impact on numerous areas of public law and policy is set to grow. Among these, human rights concerns are particularly acute. They include forced mass migration, increased disease incidence and strain on health care systems, threatened food and water security, the disappearance and degradation of shelter, land, livelihoods and cultures, and the threat of conflict. This inquiry into the human rights dimensions of climate change looks beyond potential impacts to examine the questions raised by climate change policies: accountability for extraterritorial harms; constructing reliable enforcement mechanisms; assessing redistributional outcomes; and allocating burdens, benefits, rights and duties among perpetrators and victims, both public and private. The book examines a range of so-far unexplored theoretical and practical concerns that international law and other scholars and policy-framers will find increasingly difficult to ignore. It is the first attempt to examine the interface between human rights and climate change and picks out areas where interactions between the two disciplines can be found. Hence this collection examines where an interface is already taking place and forecasts the type of techniques and strategies it may ‘engender or adopt’.

Citation

(2010, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge)

Paper

Human Rights and Climate Change

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