Tag Archives: environmental governance

Good Environmental Governance: Some Trends in the South Asian Region (P. Hassan)

Author(s)

Parvez Hassan

Keywords

environmental governance, South Asia, legacy of colonialism, constitutional provisions, judiciary, environmental rights, environmental protection

Abstract

This paper covers important trends toward good environmental governance in the South Asia region comprising India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Maldives. The region is home to over 1.6 billion people constituting about a quarter of the total global population. Much of the region is bound by a common history of British colonialism and generally inherited its legacy of the rule of law. Following the example of India, many countries in the region adopted written Constitutions after their independence. A common feature of some of these Constitutions is the elaborate formulation of fundamental rights including the rights to life, liberty, religion, association and speech that are ‘justiciable’; that is, enforceable through the judiciary. This combination of constitutional provisions and judiciary-enforced actions has provided the basic structure for good environmental governance in the region. It is a unique story where the region’s judiciaries have played a pioneering role to promote and protect environmental rights.

Citation

(2001) 6(1) Asia Pacific Journal of Environmental Law 1.

Paper

Good Environmental Governance: Some Trends in the South Asian Region

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The Chagga People & Environmental Changes on Mount Kilimanjaro: Lessons to Learn (L. Sébastien)

Author

Léa Sébastien

Keywords

Agroforestry, Chagga, environmental governance, hydrisystem, Kilamanjaro, social relations, sustainable development, territory

Abstract

Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain in Africa, is a site of exceptional diversity. However, its fragile balance is presently under threat, mainly from hydrological issues. Scientists and politicians have different hypotheses concerning the condition and availability of water on the mountain, thus far without consensus. Some of these hypotheses infer that the local Chagga communities living on Kilimanjaro’s slopes are implicated in the overall degradation of natural resources. A major part of the research presented in this paper focuses on the Chagga people’s view of their environment. The research uses the Actor in 4 Dimensions (A4D) methodology. This multidisciplinary conceptual model helps one to understand a territory by analysing the relations between individuals (social link) and the relations between humans and no humans (natural link). This paper aims to (1) present the A4D model and its innovative methodology, (2) analyse the stakeholders’ dynamics around environmental issues on the mountain and (3) focus on the Chagga’s perception of natural resource evolution and management. The A4D results show that the Chagga display a profound attachment to their territory, the forest is the element creating social relations, technical progress can mean social regression, conflicts over natural resources are increasing and hydrological risks on Mount Kilimanjaro are primarily of a social nature.

Citation

(2010) 2 Climate and Development 364

Paper

The Chagga People and Environmental Changes on Mount Kilimanjaro: Lessons to Learn

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Extending Refugee Definitions to Cover Environmentally Displaced Persons Displaces…(K.K. Moberg)

Author

Kara K. Moberg

Keywords

Environmental refugees, climate change, global warming, environmental displacement, cost-sharing approach

Abstract

The growing effects of climate change and global warming create a need for protection of environmentally displaced persons. While governments could use current international and domestic definitions of refugee to protect environmentally displaced persons, it is unlikely that any government will do so. Even if governments did extend existing refugee and asylum laws to include environmentally displaced persons, it would provide insufficient protection. In addition, it would consume judicial resources needed for persons currently receiving protection under refugee and asylum laws. The protection of environmentally displaced persons, while necessary, should not fall under current asylum and refugee laws. Instead, new domestic and international laws should grant environmentally displaced persons refuge under a more protective, cost-sharing approach.

Citation

(2009) 94 Iowa Law Review 1107

Paper

Extending Refugee Definitions to Cover Environmentally Displaced Persons Displaces Necessary Protection

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Governance for the Environment: New Perspectives (M.A. Delmas and O.R. Young)

Editor(s)

Magali A. Delmas (University of California, USA)
Oran R. Young (University of California, USA)

Keywords

Ecosystems, environmental governance, human-dominated, economics, management, political science, environmental policies

Abstract

We live in an era of human-dominated ecosystems in which the demand for environmental governance is rising rapidly. At the same time, confidence in the capacity of governments to meet this demand is waning. How can we address the resultant governance deficit and achieve sustainable development? This book brings together perspectives from economics, management, and political science in order to identify innovative approaches to governance and bring them to bear on environmental issues. The authors’ analysis of important cases demonstrates how governance systems need to fit their specific setting and how effective policies can be developed without relying exclusively on government. They argue that the future of environmental policies lies in coordinated systems that simultaneously engage actors located in the public sector, the private sector, and civil society. Governance for the Environment draws attention to cutting-edge questions for practitioners and analysts interested in environmental governance.

• An original and well thought out presentation of cutting edge interdisciplinary perspectives on governance for the environment • Examines the roles, relationships and motivations of actors throughout the economic and political system, demonstrating how environmental governance is about much more than government action • Balances theory with strong, contextualized summaries of real world results

Citation

Magali A. Delmas and Oran R. Young (eds), Governance for the Environment: New Perspectives (CUP, UK/US 2009)

Books

Governance for the Environment: New Perspectives

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Environmental Governance Challenges in Kiribati: An Agenda for Legal & Policy Responses (D. Olowu)

Author

Dejo Olowu

Keywords

Biodiversity, environment, environmental governance, international law, Kiribati, national, pollution, regional, South Pacific, waste management.

Abstract

Since the global notion of environmental governance is principally about how to achieve the goals of environmental conservation and sustainable development, analysing approaches to environmental governance invariably requires critical study of the policies and structures in place that determine how power is exercised and how environmental decisions are made not only in the abstract context of internationalism but with particular regard to national situations. This essay examines the legal and policy frameworks regulating environmental protection and the conservation of biodiversity within the broader goal of effective environmental governance in Kiribati. Acknowledging that Kiribati encounters formidable challenges in institutional, normative and policy terms, this essay particularly deals with the issue of pollution and its long- and short-term implications for this nation of many atolls. While highlighting the existence of significant treaties, municipal laws and diverse policy mechanisms, this essay identifies gaps and weaknesses, making suggestions for their reform and enhancement. Recognising that the path to the future lies in the synergy of initiatives and inputs from the government, the people and all other stakeholders in the environmental well-being of Kiribati, this essay proffers some viable trajectories for strategic responses.

Citation

(2007) 3(3) Law, Environment and Development Journal 259

Paper

Environmental Governance Challenges in Kiribati : An Agenda for Legal and Policy Responses

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