Tag Archives: desertification

International Legal Protection for Victims of Environmental Abuse (M.L. Schwartz)

Author(s)

Michelle Leighton Schwartz

Keywords

Human Rights, Right to life, Rights of indigenous peoples, procedural human rights, human right to a healthy environment, environmental refugees, desertification, flooding, international finance institutions, International Court of Justice, International Labour Organisation

Excerpt

Environmental disasters are increasing. They often result from human activities, such as the disposal of toxic chemicals, the generation of power, and the exploitation of oil. Mismanagement of natural resources has caused severe watershed erosion, desertification and atmospheric pollution which, in turn, have seriously impaired human life. Although the human suffering associated with environmental destruction is growing, international and regional human rights institutions have yet to clarify the obligations of governments to protect and provide remedies for these victims. This paper seeks to inspire such clarification and suggests legal and institutional reforms toward that end.

Citation

(1993) 18 Yale Journal of International Law 355

Paper

International Legal Protection for Victims of Environmental Abuse

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Implementing the UNCCD: towards a recipe for success (C. Bassett & J. Talafre)

Author(s)

Charles Bassett and Joana Talafre

Keywords

Environment;International law; Deserts; Environmental protection; Foreign investment; International development; International environmental law

Abstract

Comments on the lack of international political will to translate the provisions of the Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa 1994, into international action. Reviews the obstacles to progress, highlighting the complexity of the global mechanism for sharing the costs of implementation and the competing approaches of different multilateral environmental agreements to the same problems. Considers possible solutions, including revision of the Convention’s objectives, and argues that showing how tackling land degradation issues can also promote socio economic developments will lead to a convergence of goals, mobilise international political will and increase investment.

Citation

(2003) 12(2) Review of European Community and International Environmental Law 133-139

Paper

Implementing the UNCCD: towards a recipe for success

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Environmental Law & the Threat of Global Climate Change to Cultural Heritage Sites (S. Gruber)

Author

Stefan Gruber (University of Sydney)

Keywords

Climate change, cultural heritage, desertification, permafrost, cultural landscapes, sea level rise

Abstract

Climate change poses a severe threat to many cultural heritage sites. Threats include floods, increasing thunderstorms and rainfall, desertification, deterioration of permafrost and the decay of cultural landscapes. Protecting cultural heritage sites proves to be very difficult because they are as diverse as the threats from climate change. This paper argues that laws from different areas of environmental law such as heritage conservation law, pollution law, land use law, construction law, water law, environmental impact assessment law and planning law must be used in an integrated way to form a comprehensive system of legal instruments and enforcement mechanisms in order to minimise the effects of global climate change on heritage properties.

Citation

Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 08/117 (Paper presented at the Climate Law in Developing Countries Conference “Climate Law in Developing Countries post-2012: North and South Perspectives”, IUCN, Academy of Environmental Law, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa, Canada, pp. 26-28, September 2008)

Paper

Environmental Law and the Threat of Global Climate Change to Cultural Heritage Sites.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail