Tag Archives: climate injustice

Towards ‘climate justice’? A critical reflection on legal subjectivity and climate injustice: warning signals, patterned hierarchies, directions for future law and policy (A. Grear)

Author

Anna Grear

Keywords

Climate justice, climate injustice, co-option, critique, legal subjectivity, corporate juridical privilege, legal complicity, human rights, critical reflexivity

Abstract

The recent high-level emergence of ‘climate justice’ in the normative and policy discourse addressing the social and legal aspects of climate change is welcome. However, certain dangers of co-option face the concept as it gains institutional traction. Drawing on a critical theoretical reading of the patterns of climate injustice and their relationship with liberal legal subjectivity (and with the related themes of the politics of dis/embodiment, corporate juridical privilege, (neo)colonialism and the highly uneven structure of globalized world order), this article argues that ‘climate justice’ is more likely to sustain the necessary resistive critical energies if informed by critical legal reflection on historical and contemporary patterns of climate injustice, particularly as they emerge in relation to the privileged trope of liberal legal subjectivity and the juridical privileging of the corporate form. Future policy directions indicated by the analysis are briefly introduced.

Citation

(2014) 0 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 103-133

Publication

Towards ‘climate justice’? A critical reflection on legal subjectivity and climate injustice: warning signals, patterned hierarchies, directions for future law and policy

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Choosing a Future: Social and Legal Aspects of Climate Change (A. Grear and C. Gearty)

Authors

Anna Grear and Conor Gearty

Keywords

Choosing a future, human rights, environment, rights of future generations, climate justice, climate injustice, policy makers, law and society

Abstract

Climate change is far more than a problem of measures of carbon dioxide, methane and the production of pollutants. It signals an urgent crisis of human hierarchy and a crisis of self-understanding. Climate change calls out for new ways of looking, hearing and acting in the world. It calls out for a justice embracing the whole of the vulnerable living order. It calls out for a transformation – in response – of human society and of law itself. This collection offers one unique strand of a far wider search. It points unerringly towards the need, now, to choose between futures.

Citation

(2014) 0 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 1-7

Publication

Choosing a Future: The Social and Legal Aspects of Climate Change

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Resisting Global Toxics: Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice (D.N. Pellow)

Author

DN Pellow

Keywords

Toxic waste, hazardous material, health, ecosystem damage, environmental justice

Abstract

Every year, nations and corporations in the “global North” produce millions of tons of toxic waste. Too often this hazardous material—linked to high rates of illness and death and widespread ecosystem damage—is exported to poor communities of color around the world. In Resisting Global Toxics, David Naguib Pellow examines this practice and charts the emergence of transnational environmental justice movements to challenge and reverse it. Pellow argues that waste dumping across national boundaries from rich to poor communities is a form of transnational environmental inequality that reflects North/South divisions in a globalized world, and that it must be theorized in the context of race, class, nation, and environment.

Building on environmental justice studies, environmental sociology, social movement theory, and race theory, and drawing on his own research, interviews, and participant observations, Pellow investigates the phenomenon of global environmental inequality and considers the work of activists, organizations, and networks resisting it. He traces the transnational waste trade from its beginnings in the 1980s to the present day, examining global garbage dumping, the toxic pesticides that are the legacy of the Green Revolution in agriculture, and today’s scourge of dumping and remanufacturing high tech and electronics products. The rise of the transnational environmental movements described in Resisting Global Toxics charts a pragmatic path toward environmental justice, human rights, and sustainability.

Citation

David Naguib Pellow, Resisting Global Toxics : Transnational Movements for Environmental Justic (MIT Press, 2007)

Book

Resisting Global Toxics: Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice

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Are the affluent prepared to pay for the planet? (R. Meyer and U. Liebe)

Author(s)

Reto Meyer and Ulf Liebe

Keywords

Willingness to pay, environmental goods, affluence hypothesis, subjective discount rate, environmental justice

Abstract

A large number of ‘environmental justice’ studies show that wealthier people are less affected by environmental burdens and also consume more resources than poorer people. Given this double inequity, we ask, to what extent are affluent people prepared to pay to protect the environment? The analyses are couched within the compensation/affluence hypothesis, which states that wealthier persons are able to spend more for environmental protection than their poorer counterparts. Further, we take into account various competing economic, psychological and sociological determinants of individuals’ willingness to pay (WTP) for both public environmental goods (e.g., general environmental protection) and quasi-private environmental goods (e.g., CO2-neutral cars). Such a comprehensive approach contrasts with most other studies in this field that focus on a limited number of determinants and goods. Multivariate analyses are based on a general population survey in Switzerland (N = 3,369). Although income has a positive and significant effect on WTP supporting the compensation hypothesis, determinants such as generalized interpersonal trust that is assumed to be positively associated with civic engagement and environmental concern prove to be equally important. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that time preferences can considerably influence survey-based WTP for environmental goods; since investments in the environment typically pay off in the distant future, persons with a high subjective discount rate are less likely to commit.

Citation

( 9 July 2010 ) Population and Environment Online

Paper

Are the affluent prepared to pay for the planet? Explaining willingness to pay for public and quasi-private environmental goods in Switzerland

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Race, Class, and Katrina: Human Rights and (Un)Natural Disaster (H. Lewis)

Author

Hope Lewis

Keywords

International human rights, Hurricane Katrina, aftermath, international humanitarian disaster, human rights crisis, densely populated, government inaction, racial injustice

Abstract

This essay reflects on the international human rights implications of Hurricane Katrina; it is published as Chapter 11 of the collection Environmental Justice in the New Millennium: Global Perspectives on Race, Ethnicity, and Human Rights (Filomina Chioma Steady, ed., Palgrave-MacMillan 2009).

For those of us in the human rights movement, it seemed natural to see Katrina and its aftermath as both a massive international humanitarian disaster and a human rights crisis. This was not just the awful result of a huge storm having hit a densely populated area and thereby necessitating the marshalling of public and private humanitarian aid. It also revealed government inaction and affirmatively abusive actions before, during, and after the storm hit that implicate international human rights standards.

We know that Katrina was not the last disaster of such devastating proportions. The impact of global climate change, …illegal dumping of toxic waste in poor neighborhoods and in the Global South, inequitable agricultural policies and high food prices, …the privatization of water , and inadequate building standards, all play roles in causing natural and man-made disasters. As this chapter was going to press, the new U.S. administration under President Obama was also facing an economic crisis of global proportions. These events also teach us that such disasters need not be accompanied by the unnatural human rights disasters of abuse, neglect, and racial injustice.

Citation

Northeastern UniversitySchool of Law Research Paper No. 38-2009 / Environmental Justice in the New Millennium: Global Perspectives on Race, Ethnicity, and Human Rights (Pargrave Macmillan, 2009)

Paper

Race, Class, and Katrina Human Rights and (Un) Natural Disaster

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