Tag Archives: climate change

Are we adapting to climate change? (L.Berrang-Ford, et al)

Author(s)

Lea Berrang-Ford, James D. Ford and Jaclyn Paterson (McGill University)

Keywords

Climate change; Global adaptation; Systematic review; Indicators; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC

Abstract

Human systems will have to adapt to climate change. Understanding of the magnitude of the adaptation challenge at a global scale, however, is incomplete, constrained by a limited understanding of if and how adaptation is taking place. Here we develop and apply a methodology to track and characterize adaptation action; we apply these methods to the peer-reviewed, English-language literature. Our results challenge a number of common assumptions about adaptation while supporting others: (1) Considerable research on adaptation has been conducted yet the majority of studies report on vulnerability assessments and natural systems (or intentions to act), not adaptation actions. (2) Climate change is rarely the sole or primary motivator for adaptation action. (3) Extreme events are important adaptation stimuli across regions. (4) Proactive adaptation is the most commonly reported adaptive response, particularly in developed nations. (5) Adaptation action is more frequently reported in developed nations, with middle income countries underrepresented and low-income regions dominated by reports from a small number of countries. (6) There is limited reporting on adaptations being developed to take advantage of climate change or focusing on women, elderly, or children.

Citation

(2011) 21(1) Global Environmental Change 25-33

Paper

Are we adapting to climate change?

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Tackling Climate Change at the Local Level: Constitutional Challenges … (M. O’Brien and S. Fathi)

Author(s)

Mike O’Brien and Sahar Fathi

Keywords

GHG emissions; Building sector, Legislation

Abstract

This article discusses Seattle’s attempts to reduce GHG emissions from the building sector, analyzing the potential application of Utility Bill Financing and PACE programs. The article next analyzes the constitutional hurdles that threaten to impede energy efficiency financing, looking in particular at HB 2853. Finally the article concludes by stating the case for the passage of legislation like HB 2853, and reiterating the ability of cities like Seattle to effectively implement a Utility Bill Financing program.

Citation

(2011) 1 Seattle Journal of Environmental Law

Paper

Tackling Climate Change at the Local Level: Constitutional Challenges to Housing Efficiency Legislation in Washington

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Rethinking environmental rights: climate change, conservation and the ECJ (P. Sands)

Author

Professor Philippe Sands QC (Lecture)

Keywords

Environmental rights; climate change; conservation; Christopher Stone; anthropocentric; standing (locus standi); NGOs; Principle 10 UNRCED (Rio); European Court of Justice; Aarhus Convention; lack of legal accountability.

Abstract

The article was initially a lecture given at the David Hall Memorial Lecture (11th June 2008). It commences by referring to Stones seminal article ‘Should trees have standing’ (available on GNHRE) and hence reveals that rights to protect the environment are problematic from a conservationists standpoint as such rights are anthropocentric in nature. When the state fails to protect the environment who has standing to bring proceedings? Although in England and Wales the law has come a long way to allow NGOs and individuals standing to bring an action to challenge a ‘failure of the state to give effect to its environmental obligations’ this is unfortunately not the position in the European Court of Justice. Despite flouting the Principles and Articles of both binding treaties and ‘soft law’ documents the European Community institutions continue to deny the concerned individual and NGOs the right to protect the environment.

Citation

(2008) 20(3) Environmental Law and Management, 120-126.

Paper

Rethinking environmental rights: climate change, conservation and the European Court of Justice.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail