Tag Archives: climate change

Environmental Technologies, Intellectual Property and Climate Change (ed. Abbe E. L. Brown)

Editor

Abbe E.L. Brown

Keywords

development studies, law and development, environment, climate change, innovation and technology, technology and ict, academic law, environmental law, human rights, intellectual property law, law and development, politics and public policy, human rights

Abstract

Many disciplines are relevant to combating climate change. This challenging book draws together legal, regulatory, geographic, industrial and professional perspectives and explores the role of technologies in addressing climate change through mitigation, adaptation and information gathering. It explores some key issues. Is intellectual property part of the solution, an obstacle to change or peripheral? Are there more important questions? Do they receive the attention they deserve? And from whom? This innovative book will play an important role in stimulating holistic discussion and action on an issue of key importance to society.

1. Low carbon futures for all? Strategic options for global availability of environmental technologies 29 Keith Culver

2. The puzzling persistence of the intellectual property right/climate change relationship 59 Navraj Singh Ghaleigh

3. Failure is not an option: enhancing the use of intellectual property tools to secure wider and more equitable access to climate change technologies 84 Jon P. Santamauro

4. Partnership and sharing: beyond mainstream mechanisms 108 Anna Davies

5. Public–private partnerships for wider and equitable access to climate technologies 128 Elisa Morgera and Kati Kulovesi

6. Climate change, technology transfer and intellectual property rights: a modest exercise in thinking outside the box 152 Krishna Ravi Srinivas

7. Access to essential environmental technologies and poor communities: why human rights should be prioritized 181 Oche Onazi

8. Achieving greater access: a new role for established legal principles? 198 Abbe E.L. Brown

9. The ‘new normal’: food, climate change and intellectual property 223 Baskut Tuncak

10. Intellectual property: property rights and the public interest 249 James McLean

11. A view from inside the renewable energy industry 265 Mervyn D. Jones

12. A private institutional investment perspective 271 David A. McGrory

Citation

2013. Environmental Technologies, Intellectual Property and Climate Change, ed. Abbe E. L. Brown. Cheltenham: Elgar.

Paper

Environmental Technologies, Intellectual Property and Climate Change

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Bringing Local Voices to the Global Negotiation Table: Norm Dissemination and Consensus Building on Tropical Forests and Climate Change (M. G. Rodrigues)

Author(s)

Maria G. Rodrigues

Keywords

transnational advocacy networks, norm dissemination, Amazonia, Brazil, REDD + , climate change

Abstract

Initially rejected by the parties to the Kyoto Protocol, efforts to protect tropical forests are now an accepted strategy to mitigate the impact of climate change. Inspired by long-standing demands of Amazonia’s forests peoples, the notion of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD +) has been embraced in global arenas. What accounts for this shift in perceptions about the relation between forests and climate change? Answers lie in the efforts of a transnational advocacy network (TAN) at norm dissemination and consensus-building within Brazil and in the Kyoto Protocol. This study highlights the importance of domestic activism unfolding in democratizing societies to enhance the influence of transnational advocacy networks in norm dissemination and consensus building in global arenas. It enlarges the explanatory power of normative approaches by documenting a case in which the idea and set of values being globally propagated do not emanate from a Western liberal tradition.

Citation

(2015) New Global Studies 9(2) pp. 125–157

Paper

Bringing Local Voices to the Global  Negotiation Table: Norm Dissemination  and Consensus Building on Tropical  Forests and Climate Change

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Protecting Environmental Rights Through the Bilateral Agreements of the European Union: Mapping the Field (E. Morgera)

Author(s)

Elisa Morgera

Keywords

EU external relations, EU environmental policy, environmental rights, EU agreements, climate change, biodiversity, forest, traditional knowledge, corporate accountability

Abstract

The present paper aims to map existing and future opportunities for utilizing EU bilateral agreements to promote the protection of environmental rights, as well as available legal avenues to address missed opportunities and possible risks that EU environmental action abroad may negatively impact on environmental rights in third countries. It starts with a brief overview of the external environmental policy of the EU, including constitutional requirements to couple human rights and environmental protection in external relations and an introduction to the practice of EU bilateral agreements. The chapter will then provide a snapshot of the environment-and-human-rights connection in EU law from an internal perspective, to demonstrate the political sensitivity of the issue. Against this background, the central part of the paper will identify six thematic areas in which entry points for the protection of environmental rights exist in the framework of EU bilateral agreements. The final section will offer a preliminary reflection of the human rights risks of current environmental external relations of the Union and possible avenues to tackle these risks in EU and international law.

Citation

(2014) Lenzerini, F and A Vrdoljak, eds. International Law for Common Goods: Normative Perspectives on Human Rights, Culture and Nature (Hart) pp. 421-441

Paper

Protecting Environmental Rights Through the Bilateral Agreements of the European Union: Mapping the Field

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The Right to be Cold: Global Warming and Human Rights (M. Wagner)

Author(s)

Martin Wagner

Keywords

Climate Change, Human Rights, Indigenous People, Inuit, The Right to Be Cold, Cultural Rights

Excerpt

The relationship between global warming and human rights is something that is beginning to be talked about now, but six or seven years ago no-one had made the connection.  I am going to explore the relationship through the context of some work I have done with the Inuit people of the Arctic regions of the world, and in particular a case that I have brought on their behalf. I want you to remember that this connection between global warming and human rights is not limited by any means to the people of the Arctic; there are potential human rights implications of global warming everywhere around the world.
{…]
So you have the Inuit culture that depends on the ice, snow and cold and you have the effects of global warming in the Arctic. It all raises the question: Is there a human right to be cold? Or to make it more global, is there a human right, for example, to be dry? Let me explain about why I think there is a connection between human rights and global warming. The first thing to remember is that international law and the international community recognise a special place for indigenous people in the community of nations and the special responsibility of nations. But in particular, international human rights recognises that there is a connection between indigenous people and the territory that they occupy and depend on for their livelihood and for their culture that is special and it needs to be
maintained and protected. That is relevant because many of the most vulnerable communities that are being affected first by global warming are indigenous communities.

Citation

(2007) in Human Rights 2007, The Year in Review, Smith and Contini (Eds) (Monash Castan Centre for Human Rights Law, 2008)

Paper

The Right to be Cold: Global Warming and Human Rights (Pre-Publication Conference Paper)

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The Contribution of Human Rights as an Additional Perspective on Climate Change Impacts in the Pacific (S. Tully)

Author(s)

Stephen Tully

Keywords

Climate Change, Human Rights, Climate Impacts, United Nations, Pacific Islands, Resettlement, International Humanitarian Law, International Environmental Law, Environmental Refugees

Abstract

The adverse impacts of climate change include temperature variations, lost biodiversity and more frequent extreme weather events. In particular, low-lying Pacific Island countries and territories will be inundated if predicted sea level rises eventuate. These impacts threaten the continued enjoyment by Pacific Islanders of their fundamental human rights. Rising sea levels threatens their personal safety, continued good health, secure access to proper means of subsistence including food and water and the habitability of coastal settlements. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change encourages developed states to adopt measures that mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and financially support adaptation activity undertaken by developing countries. However, several states lack the requisite political will, financial support is inadequate, adaptation measures are limited and small island developing states are becoming increasingly vulnerable. This article provides an overview of climate change impacts within the Pacific region in human rights terms. It argues that the strategy of adaptation, although consistent with the sustainable development agenda, is limited as an effective long-term response to sea level rise. It proposes an international framework that ensures, in the worst-case scenario, that affected individuals are relocated and resettled within other states. It draws upon existing and emergent legal regimes with respect to humanitarian assistance, natural disasters, maritime law concerning search and rescue, internally displaced persons, the environmental refugee concept and the obligations of interstate cooperation arising under international environmental law in the event of transboundary harm. This framework will be most effective if underpinned by the many positive contributions to be made by the paradigm for the protection of human rights.

Citation

(2007) 5 New Zealand Journal of Public International Law 175

Paper

The Contribution of Human Rights as an Additional Perspective on Climate Change Impacts in the Pacific

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