Tag Archives: civil society

Defending the Environment: Civil Society Strategies to Enforce International Environmental Law (L.A. Malone and S. Pasternack)

Author(s)

Linda A. Malone and Scott Pasternack

Keywords

environmental protection, public health, environmental law, policy, international law, politics, civil society, law enforcement

Abstract

Defending the Environment promotes the use and awareness of several different international, regional, and domestic strategies designed to safeguard the environment and public health.

The text emphasizes practice as well as theory; unlike works devoted exclusively to theoretical aspects of international environmental law and policy, the authors provide the what, how, when, where, and why for resolving environmental and public health problems in front of international courts, tribunals, commissions, committees, secretariats, and, at times, their domestic counterparts.

This is an indispensible handbook for anyone who needs to be aware of the important legal and political strategies made available to them by various instruments of international law.

Citation

Linda A. Malone and Scott Pasternack, Defending the Environment: Civil Society Strategies to Enforce International Environmental Law (Transnational Publishers, 2004)

Book

Defending the Environment: Civil Society Strategies to Enforce International Environmental Law

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Global Governance of Food Production and Consumption (P. Oosterveer)

Author

Peter Oosterveer (Wageningen University , The Netherlands )

Keywords

Food, global, global food governance, regulation, consumer demand, environment, animal welfare, social justice, civil society

Abstract

The provision of food is undergoing radical transformations throughout the global community. Peter Oosterveer argues that, as a consequence, conventional national governmental regulations can no longer adequately respond to existing and emerging food risks and to environmental concerns. This book examines these challenges.

Translating recent innovative thinking in the social sciences – as seen in the work of Manuel Castells and John Urry amongst others – to the world of food, this book reviews the challenges facing global food governance and the innovative regulatory arrangements that are being introduced by different governments, NGOs and private companies. The analysis includes case-studies on the European BSE crisis, GM-food regulation, salmon and shrimp farming and food labelling. The author highlights how contemporary governance arrangements also have to acknowledge increasing consumer demand for food produced with care for the environment, animal welfare and social justice. Developing and implementing adequate global food governance arrangements therefore demands the active involvement of private firms, consumers, and civil society organisations with national governments.

Citation

Peter Oosterveer, Global Governance of Food Production and Consumption (Edward Elgard, 2007)

Book

Global Governance of Food Production and Consumption

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In the Way of Development: Indigenous Peoples, Life Projects and Globalization (M. Blaser, et al)

Editor(s)

Mario Blaser, Harvey A. Feit and Glenn McRae

Keywords

Indigenous Peoples, Development, Paraguayan Indigenism, Yshiro People‘s Life Projects, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Sustainable Development, Animal Partners, Grassroots Transnationalism, Great Whale Campaign, States, Markets, Civil Society, Canada, Native/Non-Native Alliances, Mining Corporations, Chilean Economic Expansion, Mega-Development Project, Mapuche Territories, Hydroelectric Development, Bío-Bío River, Anthropology and Human Rights, Advocacy, Ecological Ethnicities, Russian Far East, Conflicting Discourses, Property, Governance, Indigenous North, Resistance, Determination, Perseverance

Abstract

A collaboration between indigenous leaders, social activists and scholars from a wide range of disciplines, In the Way of Development explores the current situation of indigenous peoples enmeshed in the remorseless expansion of the modern economy.

The volume assembles a rich diversity of statements, case studies and wider thematic explorations all starting with indigenous peoples as actors, not victims. The accounts come primarily from North America, but include also studies from South America, and the former Soviet Union.

In the Way of Development shows how the boundaries between indigenous peoples‘ organizations, civil society, the state, markets, development and the environment are ambiguous and constantly changing. This fact makes local political agency possible, but also, ironically, opens the possibility of undermining it.

The volume presents these complex, power-laden, often contradictory features of indigenous agency and relationships. It shows how peoples do not just resist or react to the pressures of market and state, but also sustain ‘life projects‘ of their own.

Citation

Mario Blaser, Harvey A. Feit and Glenn McRae (eds), In the Way of Development: Indigenous Peoples, Life Projects and Globalization (Zed Books, 2004)

Book

In the Way of Development: Indigenous Peoples, Life Projects and Globalization

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Civil Society, Corporate Accountability and the Politics of Climate Change (P. Newell)

Author

Peter Newell

Keywords

Accountability, civil society, global regime, government, UN bodies, private corporations, climate change

Abstract

This article uses the lens of accountability to explore the shifting strategies of a range of civil society groups in their engagement with key actors in the global regime on climate change. It first reviews traditional strategies aimed at increasing the ‘public accountability’ of governments and UN bodies for agreed actions on climate change. This approach is then compared with the growing tendency to pursue the accountability of private corporations with respect to climate change. These strategies aim, among other things, to promote ‘civil regulation’: that is, governance of the private sector through civil society oversight. The final part of the article reflects on the possibilities and limitations of civil society actors performing such accountability roles in the contemporary politics of climate change and suggests key challenges for future climate advocacy. It argues that success in enhancing the accountability of public and private actors on the issue of climate change has been highly uneven and reflects both the effectiveness of the strategies adopted and the responsiveness of the target actors and institutions.

Citation

(2008) 8 Global Environmental Politics 122-153

Paper

Civil Society, Corporate Accountability and the Politics of Climate Change

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