Tag Archives: children

Global Obligations for the Right to Food (G. Kent)

Editor

George Kent

Keywords

Children, human rights, right to food

Abstract

A child may be born into a poor country, but not a poor world. If global human rights are to be meaningful, they must be universal. Global Obligations for the Right to Food assesses the nature and depth of the global responsibility to provide adequate food to the world’s population.

While governments have a primary responsibility for assuring the right to food for people under national jurisdictions, we as a global community are all responsible. Global Obligations for the Right to Food explores the various actions that should be taken by governments, non-governmental organizations, and individuals to ensure that citizens of the world have access to adequate food.

Citation

George Kent (ed), Global Obligations for the Right to Food (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008)

Book

Global Obligations for the Right to Food

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Sustaining the Environmental Rights of Children: An Exploratory Critique (K.E. MacDonald)

Author

Karen E. MacDonald

Keywords

Law, environment,humanrights, children, sustainable development, poverty reduction, declaration, convention

Abstract

This article suggests that the interpretation and implementation of humanrights as environmental humanrights should explicitly consider children as the holders, recipients or beneficiaries of environmental rights and explores the means and reasons for doing so. The article presents a brief synopsis as to the current state of play on the status of environmental humanrights, and more specifically, the environmental rights of children. The work emanates from the assumption that children can have environmental rights and examines rationales for acknowledging that children can have environmental rights or be recognized as a distinct category of environmental rights-holder. Justifications for this position are presented throughout in an attempt to demonstrate how and why the environmental rights of children can be acknowledged and advanced in a more pragmatic manner, building upon existing humanrights. In this regard, reasoning is offered as to why the environmental rights of children can be linked to the concept and practice of sustainable development, as it is currently understood, as a means of not only recognizing those rights but also of achieving some pragmatic environment-related goals. This is in view of the gradual acknowledgment that the policy agenda is evolving from environment to sustainable development. The mobilization of environment-related humanrights to achieve practical goals for children is an additional focus of this work. Hence, the article identifies links between environmental rights and sustainable development as promulgated in several international environmental instruments, including those agreed to at the World Summit on Sustainable Development, in order to support the argument for recognizing and acknowledging the importance of the environmental rights of children.

A critical evaluation of the environment-related provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child is undertaken where a link can be drawn with the environment and the aims of increasing sustainable development and poverty reduction. Such evaluation is based on the fact that the UNCRC can potentially operate as a launching pad for greater application of the environmental rights of children.

A brief examination of case law is undertaken to identify the links between the environment,rights, sustainable development, and where possible, children. The work also assesses some of the limitations and possible solutions with respect to the enforcement and implementation of children’s environmental rights. Lastly, the article offers recommendations and provide some conclusions from the discussion of these issues.

Citation

(2006) 18 Fordham Environmental Law Review 1

Paper

Sustaining the Environmental Rights of Children: An Exploratory Critique

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A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment (J. Garbarino and G. Sigman)

Editors(s)

James Garbarino and Garry Sigman

Keywords

Adversity, Child Abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Neglect, Child Psychopathology, Child Welfare, Childhood Trauma, Children and Trauma, Children’s Rights, Criminal Justice, Environment, Gun Violence, Healthy Environment, Human Rights of Children, Loyola University Chicago’s Center for the Human Rights of C, Loyola University Symposium on the Human Rights of Children, Pediatric Obesity, Resilience, Toxic Environment, Trauma, Violence Prevention

Abstract

It’s a startling reality that more American children are victims—and perpetrators—of violence than those of any other developed country. Yet unlike the other nations, the United States has yet to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Compelling, readable, and interdisciplinary, A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment provides an abundance of skilled observation, important findings, and keen insights to place children’s well-being in the vanguard of human rights concerns, both in the United States and globally. Within this volume, authors examine the impediments to the crucial goals of justice, safety, dignity, well-being, and meaning in children’s lives, factors as varied as socioeconomic stressors, alienated, disengaged parents, and corrosive moral lessons from the media. The complex role of religious institutions in promoting and, in many cases, curtailing children’s rights is analyzed, as are international efforts by advocates and policymakers to address major threats to children’s development, including: • War and natural disasters. • Environmental toxins (e.g., malaria and lead poisoning). • The child obesity epidemic. • Gun violence. • Child slavery and trafficking. • Toxic elements in contemporary culture. A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment is a powerful call to action for researchers and professionals in developmental, clinical child, school, and educational psychology as well as psychiatry, pediatrics, social work, general and special education, sociology, and other fields tasked with improving children’s lives.

Citation

James Garbarino and Garry Sigman (eds), A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment (Springer, 2010)

Book

A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment

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Should trees have standing? Towards legal rights for natural objects (C. Stone).

Author

Christopher Stone

Keywords

Development of rights, development of children’s rights, standing for ‘natural objects’.

Abstract

This article, from the era when the birth of modern environmentalism and conservationism arguably emanated, is an abstract but serious attempt to propose that forests, oceans and rivers, in fact the entire natural environment, should be afforded legal rights. The piece explains that the granting of new rights involves two aspects; first, legal-operational aspects and second psychic and socio-psychic aspects. The author argues that it would be seemingly ridiculous to state that ‘natural objects’ should have no rights to seek legal redress merely because they cannot speak up for themselves. It is considered normal for corporations, who cannot speak, to employ lawyers to act on their behalf; the same can be said for states, estates, children etc. The mentally incompetent or any person that is incapable of managing their own affairs is provided, by the courts, with someone who can whilst a business entity that has become ‘incompetent’ is, for example, appointed a trustee in bankruptcy; conceivably someone could apply to the courts to be the ‘guardian’ of a natural object that is perceived to be in danger.

Citation

(1972) 45 Southern California Law Review 450

Paper

Should trees have standing? Towards legal rights for natural objects.

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