Tag Archives: biofuels

The Global Food System, Environmental Protection, and Human Rights (C Gonzalez)

Author

Carmen G. Gonzalez

Keywords

Human rights law, food security, food sovereignty, right to food, biodiversity, WTO, trade policy, international environmental law, IMF, World Bank, international law, climate change, biofuels, agricultural law, international trade law, political economy

Abstract

The global food system is exceeding ecological limits while failing to meet the nutritional needs of a large segment of the world’s population. While law could play an important role in facilitating the transition to a more just and ecologically sustainable food system, the current legal framework fails to regulate food and agriculture in an integrated manner. The international legal framework governing food and agriculture is fragmented into three self-contained regimes that have historically operated in isolation from one another: international human rights law, international environmental law, and international trade law. International trade law has taken precedence over human rights and international environmental law to the detriment of small farmers and the environment. The article analyzes the international legal regime applicable to food and agriculture, explains the ways in which the current regime perpetuates food insecurity and unsustainable cultivation practices, and argues that agriculture should be removed from the purview of the World Trade Organization. The article concludes by sketching out some of the elements of an alternative approach to global governance based on the concept of food sovereignty.

Citation

Natural Resources & Environment, Vol. 26, No. 3, Winter 2012
Seattle University School of Law Research Paper No. 12-12

Publication

The Global Food System, Environmental Protection, and Human Rights

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Consumer preferences and the national treatment principle …environmental regulations…(E.B. Lydgate)

Author

Emily Barrett Lydgate

Keywords

Environment; Biofuels; Consumers; Environmental protection; International trade; Sustainability

Abstract

Considers, with reference to disputes involving the national treatment principle under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994 art. III , whether consumer preferences for environmentally friendly products should justify emerging regulations.

Citation

(2011) 10(2) World Trade Review 165-188

Paper

Consumer preferences and the national treatment principle: emerging environmental regulations prompt a new look at an old problem

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Beyond Smoke & Mirrors: Climate Change & Energy in the 21st Century (B. Richter)

Author

Burton Richter ( Stanford University , USA )

Keywords

Climate, Greenhouse Earth, Climate modeling, Future, Energy, Physicists, Economists; Energy, Emissions, Action, Fossil fuels, Electricity, Pricing carbon, Efficiency, Nuclear energy, Renewables, Biofuels, US policy, World policy

Abstract

Global climate change is one of the most important issues humanity faces today. This book assesses the sensible, senseless and biased proposals for averting the potentially disastrous consequences of global warming, allowing the reader to draw their own conclusions on switching to more sustainable energy provision. Burton Richter is a Nobel Prize-winning scientist who has served on many US and international review committees on climate change and energy issues. He provides a concise overview of our knowledge and uncertainties within climate change science , discusses current energy demand and supply patterns, and the energy options available to cut emissions of greenhouse gases. Written in non-technical language, this book presents a balanced view of options for moving from our heavy reliance on fossil fuels into a much more sustainable energy system, and is accessible to a wide range of readers without scientific backgrounds – students, policymakers, and the concerned citizen.

• Dispels confusion about all the potential solutions for averting climate change impacts, presenting both the limitations and the promise of our energy production options • Assesses the good and bad proposals for moving from heavy use of fossil fuels to a more sustainable energy provision in the future • Written in an accessible language by a Nobel Prize-winning scientist

Citation

Burton Richter, Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Climate Change and Energy in the 21st Century ( CUP , USA 2010)

Book

Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Climate Change and Energy in the 21st Century

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Consumer preferences and the national treatment principle … environmental regulations … (E.B. Lydgate)

Author

Emily Barrett Lydgate

Keywords

Environment;Biofuels; Consumers; Environmental protection; International trade; Sustainability

Abstract

Considers, with reference to disputes involving the national treatment principle under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994 art. III , whether consumer preferences for environmentally friendly products should justify emerging regulations.

Citation

(2011) 10(2) World Trade Review 165-188

Paper

Consumer preferences and the national treatment principle: emerging environmental regulations prompt a new look at an old problem

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Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (D. Zillman, et al)

Editor(s)

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández

Keywords

Health, Environment, Sustainable Development, TAANSAAFL Problem, Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Lower-Carbon Future, Climate Change, Carbon Capture and Storage, Biofuels, Public International Law, South America, Clean Energy, Africa, Heavy Duty Transition Fuels, EU Law and Policy, Wind, Nuclear Power, China, Brazil, India, Mexico, Australia, Japan, Russia, US,

Abstract

Explores topical controversies over alternative energy sources including nuclear power, and over sustainability and environmental concern versus energy supply in the developing world

Regional, sectoral and technology-based analysis, and a wide variety of national perspectives demonstrate how the law can impede or advance the shift to a significantly different world energy picture
Examines the roles of public international law and international legal bodies, regional legal structures and major international nongovernmental actors
The present energy economy, with its heavy dependence on fossil fuels, is not sustainable over the medium to long term for many interconnected reasons. Climate change is now recognized as posing a serious threat. Energy and resource decisions involving the carbon fuels therefore play a large role in this threat. Fossil fuel reserves may also be running short and many of the major reserves are in politically unstable parts of the world.

Yet citizens in nations with rapidly developing economies aspire to the benefits of the modern energy economy. China and India alone have 2.4 billion potential customers for cars, industries, and electrical services. Even so, more than half of the world’s citizens still lack access to energy. Decisions involving fossil fuels are therefore a significant part of the development equation.

This volume explains how the law can impede or advance the shift to a world energy picture significantly different from that which exists today.

It first examines the factors that create the problems of the present carbon economy, including environmental concerns and development goals. It then provides international and regional legal perspectives, examining public international law, regional legal structures, the responses of international legal bodies, and the role of major international nongovernmental actors. The book then moves on to explore sectoral perspectives including the variety of renewable energy sources, new carbon fuels, nuclear power, demand controls, and energy efficiency. Finally, the authors examine how particular States are, could, or should, be adapting legally to the challenges of moving beyond the carbon economy.

Readership: Lawyers, public policy-makers, and corporate analysts in the energy and natural resources sectors, and scholars in the fields of energy and environmental law, environmental management, development economics and sustainable development.

Citation

Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández (eds), Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition (OUP, Oxford 2008)

Book

Beyond the Carbon Economy: Energy Law in Transition

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