Tag Archives: anthoprocentrism

Competing Narratives and Complex Genealogies: The Ecosystem Approach in International Environmental Law

Author

Vito De Lucia

Keywords

Ecosystem Approach, international environmental law, anthropocentrism, ecocentrism

Abstract

The ecosystem approach, broadly understood as a legal and governance ‘strategy for the integrated management of land, water and living resources’ is being increasingly adopted within a wide variety of international environmental legal regimes. From freshwater to oceans, from biodiversity to fisheries, from Antarctica to climate adaptation, the approach provides a narrative, a policy approach and in some cases legally binding obligations for States to implement what has been called a ‘new paradigm’ of environmental management. Responding to hopes of arresting, and reversing, the increasingly negative trends of resource depletion and ecological degradation affecting most ecosystems in the world, the ecosystem approach promises to ‘protect the environment, maintain healthy ecosystems, preserve biological diversity, and achieve sustainable development’, all at once. This article problematises the ecosystem approach in order to highlight its complex genealogies, and its contested and slippery character, which makes it susceptible to discursive capture by competing narratives.

Citation

(2015) 27/1 Journal of of Environmental Law, 91-117

Paper

Competing Narratives and Complex Genealogies: The Ecosystem Approach in International Environmental Law

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On being 40: a celebration of ‘Should Trees Have Standing?’ (P. Sands)

Author

Philippe Sands

Keywords

Anthropocentric legal order, anthropocentrism, provocation, jurisprudence, law’s limits

Abstract

Few law review articles can be said to be provocative, challenging and joyously readable. Fewer still will have that effect forty years after they were written. Professor Christopher Stone’s ‘Should Trees Have Standing?’ is therefore a rare creature, an article that is as fresh and relevant as the occasion on which it first appeared in 1972. It dealt with an issue that is of even greater importance today than when Professor Stone first put pen to paper: the ability of an existing, anthropocentric legal order fully to protect and conserve our planet’s natural objects.

Citation

(2012) Issue 0 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 2-3

Paper

On being 40: a celebration of ‘Should Trees Have Standing?’

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