Tag Archives: Animal Rights

New laws on protecting animals used in scientific experiments (Report)

Keywords

Animal welfare; Animals; Cosmetics; EU law; Ethics; Scientific research

Abstract

Reports on the proposed revision of Directive 86/609 on the protection of animals used for experimental and other scientific purposes. Outlines the key changes proposed, including those on the need to conduct an ethical evaluation, the widening of the scope of the Directive, minimum housing and care requirements, the clarification of the requirements to replace the use of animals by non-animal methods, the establishment of an “Animal welfare body”, and the publication of non-technical summaries by Member States. Comments on the cosmetic testing on animals. Looks at the effect of Regulation 1907/2006 (REACH) and the revision of Directive 98/8 (Biocides Directive).

Citation

(2010) 276 EU Focus 4-5

Report

New laws on protecting animals used in scientific experiments

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The slaughter of animals and Islam (Z. Khayum)

Author

Zulfikar Khayum

Keywords

Animal welfare; Animals; Islamic law; Jurisprudence; Powers rights and duties

Abstract

Discusses the approach of Islam to the status and treatment of animals. Reviews the Islamic distinction between humanity and animals, the grounds for concluding that animals do not possess rights, and the scope of the direct and indirect obligations owed to animals. Examines the position concerning animal labour, vivisection, halal slaughter and ritual killing.

Citation

(2005) 12 UCL Jurisprudence Review 46

Paper

The slaughter of animals and Islam

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Morality and animal experimentation in medical research (Y. Theodorou)

Author

Yiannis Theodorou

Keywords

Science, Animals, Jurisprudence, Medical research, Morals and law, Vivisection

Abstract

Challenges the arguments of Peter Singer for a total ban on animal experiments, and suggests why a limited use of animals in medical research is morally acceptable. Criticises key elements of Singer’s stance, sets out the morally relevant attributes which distinguish humans from other species and considers the factors which give intrinsic value to any human life despite its physical condition. Discusses when animal experiments should be permissible, the current legal position in the UK , the arguments for and against such experimentation, and how such experiments may be minimised.

Citation

(2005) 12 UCL Jurisprudence Review 63-79

Paper

Morality and animal experimentation in medical research

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Distributive justice and co-operation in a world of humans and non-humans…(M. Coeckelbergh)

Author

Mark Coeckelbergh

Keywords

Animal, Co-operation, Distributive justice, Expert systems, Socio-legal studies

Abstract

Advocates a social-philosophical, rather than ontological, approach to whether non-humans such as animals and artificial agents should be brought within the contractarian framework of distributive justice. Highlights, with reference to John Rawls and Martha Nussbaum, the difficulties for liberalism of drawing non-humans into the sphere of distributive justice, but argues that such an approach can be justified by reliance on the notion of a co-operative scheme.

Citation

(2009) 15(1) Res Publica 67-84

Paper

Distributive justice and co-operation in a world of humans and non-humans: a contractarian argument for drawing non-humans into the sphere of justice

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Traditional hunting: Cultural rights v animal welfare (D. Thiriet)

Author

Dominique Thiriet

Keywords

Australia , Indigenous hunting practices, animal protection legislation

Abstract

This article examines how the cruelty inherent in some Indigenous hunting practices is inconsistently treated under Australian animal protection legislation. The author considers the discrimination issues raised by such inconsistencies and the legitimacy of State intervention to resolve the conflicts between cultural rights of Indigenous communities and animal welfare standards. She discusses how community concerns can be addressed whilst preserving Indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination.

Citation

(2006) 31 Alternative Law Journal 57

Paper

Traditional hunting: Cultural rights v animal welfare

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