Tag Archives: agriculture

Access to environmental information (V. Edwards)

Author

Vanessa Edwards

Keywords

Environment, Administrative law, Agriculture, European Union,  Access to information, EU law, Environmental information, Plant protection products, Trade secrets

Abstract

Reports on the European Court of Justice ruling in Stichting Natuur en Milieu v College voor de Toelating van Gewasbeschermingsmiddelen en Biociden (formerly College voor de Toelating van Bestrijdingsmiddelen) (C-266/09) on whether Directive 2003/4 was applicable to a request for information submitted as part of an application for a plant protection product authorisation since it was in force on the date that the request was refused. Considers whether the information requested was “environmental information” within the meaning of art.2 of the Directive. Assesses whether it was a trade secret.

Citation

(2011) 23(1) Journal of Environmental Law 143-144

Paper

Access to environmental information

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Public rights of way and level playing fields (M. Cardwell & J. Hunt)

Author(s)

Michael Cardwell and Jo Hunt

Keywords

Agriculture, Environment, Common agricultural policy, EU law, Environmental protection, Public rights of way

Abstract

Comments on the European Court of Justice decision in R. (on the application of Horvath) v Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (C-428/07) on the requirements for maintaining land in good agricultural and environmental condition.

Citation

(2010) 12(4) Environmental Law Review 291-300

Paper

Public rights of way and level playing fields

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Consultative Opinion on Liability of Public and Private Actors for Genetic Contamination of Non-GM Crops (Anon)

Keywords

Environment, Agriculture, Contamination, Crops, Environmental protection, Genetically modified organisms

Abstract

Provides an abridged version of the International Court of Environmental Arbitration and Conciliation’s Consultative Opinion on Liability of Public and Private Actors for Genetic Contamination of Non-GM Crops. Considers: (1) the problem of coexistence between conventional and organic farming and genetically modified (GM) farming; (2) international and supranational liability regimes; (3) the inadequacy of traditional liability in tort or under the law of neighbour relations; (4) the new generation of GMO liability laws relating to coexistence, including in Germany, Brazil and Mexico; and (5) the responsibility of food aid agencies for GMO contamination.

Citation

(2005) 7(4) Environmental Law Review 253-272

Report/Opinion

Consultative Opinion on Liability of Public and Private Actors for Genetic Contamination of Non-GM Crops

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Wildlife reforms in Scotland (C.T. Reid)

Author

Colin T. Reid

Keywords

Animals, Agriculture, Environment, Badgers, Deer, Game, Heather and grass burning, Non-native species, Scotland, Sites of special scientific interest, Wildlife

Abstract

Reflects on the main reforms proposed by the Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Bill 2010, including those concerning the game laws, snaring, non-native species, deer, badgers, sites of special scientific interest and muirburn.

Citation

(2010) 12(4) Environmental Law Review 256-265

Legislative Comment

Wildlife reforms in Scotland

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

“First, Do No Harm”: Human Rights & Efforts to Combat Climate Change (N. Roht-Arriaza)

Author

Naomi Roht-Arriaza

Keywords

Climate change, human rights, population displacement, vulnerability, agriculture, indigenous people

Abstract

This Article considers three areas where the current and emerging climate change treaty regime is particularly problematic: flexibility mechanisms, especially the Clean Development Mechanism; biofuels and energy; and forest preservation, known as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD). This Article then turns to three possible ways of building human rights considerations into the climate change regime, with their respective advantages and drawbacks. The Article concludes with some thoughts about harmonizing overlapping international legal regimes more generally.

Citation

(2010) 38 Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law 593

Paper

“First, Do No Harm”: Human Rights and Efforts to Combat Climate Change

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail