Category Archives: Water

The Human Right to Water (M. Fitzmaurice)

Author(s)

Malgosia Fitzmaurice

Keywords

human right to a clean environment, human right to water, implementation, legal status

Abstract

In the context of the contentious issue surrounding the legal status and implementation of the general human right to a clean environment, the human right to water is probably the most disputed. Much has been written about a human right to water, but no firm conclusions have been drawn as to its existence, as the practice of States in this respect is very limited.

Citation

(2006-7) 18 Fordham Environmental Law Review 537

Paper

The Human Right to Water

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Making Sand Castles as the Tide Comes in: Legal Aspects of Climate Justice (E. Burleson)

Author(s)

Elizabeth Burleson

Keywords

Climate Change, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Sustainable Development, United Nations, International Law, environmentally sound tech, mitigation, adaptation, sustainable development, and disaster risk management, public participation, Governance, water

Abstract

Achieving climate justice and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are mutually- reinforcing challenges. The achievement of both is well within the capacity of the international community. Indeed, reaching carbon neutrality in an affordable, environmentally sound way requires integrating the strategies of mitigation, adaptation, sustainable development, and disaster risk management.

Citation

(2011) 2 Journal of Energy and Environmental Law 42.

Paper

Making Sand Castles as the Tide Comes In: Legal Aspects of Climate Justice

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Road to 2015: The European Union and the Realisation of the Human Right to Water (V. Deloge)

Author

Vivien Deloge

Keywords

Human right, drinking water, sanitation, UN, EU, rights-based approach, EU institutional endorsement

Abstract

Following the recognition of the human right to drinking water and sanitation by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly and Human Rights Council in 2010, one can wonder to what extent the normative content of the right to water is efficiently implemented in the European Union in accordance with the obligation of result laid down under Arts 11 and 12 of the International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights. Adopting a rights based approach, this article considers the realisation of the quality, accessibility and affordability contents of the right to water in EU legislation and its compliance with Member States’ obligations under international and European human rights instruments, before examining the institutional endorsement of the right in the EU legal order.

Citation

(2012) 16 New Zealand Journal of Environmental Law 1.

Paper

Road to 2015: The European Union and the Realisation of the Human Right to Water

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

The Human Right to Water: Significance, Legal Status and Implications for Water Allocation (I. T. Winkler)

Authors

Inga T. Winkler

Keywords

United Nations, human rights, right to water, equality

Abstract

The United Nations General Assembly and the Human Rights Council recognised the human right to water in 2010. This formal recognition has put the issue high on the international agenda, but by itself leaves many questions unanswered. This book addresses this gap and clarifies the legal status and meaning of the right to water through a detailed analysis of its legal foundations, legal nature, normative content and corresponding State obligations.

The human right to water has wide-ranging implications for the distribution of water. Examining these implications requires putting the right to water into the broader context of different water uses and analysing the linkages and competition with other human rights that depend on water for their realisation. Water allocation is a highly political issue reflecting societal power relations, with current priorities often benefitting the well-off and powerful. Human rights, in contrast, require prioritising the most basic needs of all people. The human right to water has the potential to address these underlying structural causes of the lack of access to water rooted in inequalities and poverty by empowering people to hold the State accountable to live up to its human rights obligations and to demand that their basic needs are met with priority.

Citation

Inga T. Winkler, The Human Right to Water: Significance, Legal Status and Implications for Water Allocation (Hart Publishing, 2012)

Book

The Human Right to Water: Significance, Legal Status and Implications for Water Allocation

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Iraq: Water, Water Nowhere (M. Chulov)

Author

Martin Chulov

Keywords

Drought, Iraq , dry river beds, salt flats, water, dams, river diversion, war, water management, migration

Abstract

The Guardian’s Baghdad correspondent, Martin Chulov, brings to life Iraq’s latest plague: drought. In southern Iraq, once the lavishly, fabled Garden of Eden, Chulov walks the dry river beds and salt flats that were the cradle of civilization. Iraq’s water troubles are manifold: dams and diversions by upstream neighbors choke supply; severe shortages leave many tributaries of the mighty Tigris and EuphratesRivers at a mere trickle; and years of war and turmoil have weakened the ability of the nation’s leaders to effectively manage water resources. Millions of Iraqis have already been forced to leave their homes and fields in search of opportunities elsewhere. Unless the government can develop the nation’s oil resources and shore up new industries, an even harsher future awaits those who have already withstood so much.

Citation

(2009/2010) 26 World Policy Journal 33-40

Paper

Iraq : Water, Water Nowhere

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail