Category Archives: Social Movements

Liberal Theory, Human Rights and Water-Justice: Back to Square One? (R. D’Souza)

Author

Radha D’Souza

Keywords

Right to water, Human Rights, Global Justice Movements, Globalisation, Liberal Theory, Left ideology

Abstract

In the wake of the Fukuyama’s ‘end of history’: liberal theory’s triumph over its soviet/communist other, and the subsequent march of ‘globalisation’ and the ascendancy of neo-liberal ideology, this article interrogates the theoretical developments on the ‘Left’, the academic and activist led critiques of liberal triumphalism, by analysing the demands for recognition of waterrights as human rights particularly in regard to the Global Justice Movements that arose from disenchantment with globalisation and neo-liberal ideology. In the context of water-justice and human rights, the article investigates the substantial underpinnings of both liberal theory and the languages of the ‘Left’ tradition in regard to the development of the human right to water to reveal the shared foundations that divorce them both from the geo-historical terrain of emancipatory politics today.

Citation

(2008) Law, Social Justice & Global Development Journal / University of Westminster School od Law Research Paper No. 09-10

Paper

Liberal Theory, Human Rights and Water-Justice: Back to Square One?

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Liberal Theory, Human Rights and Water-Justice: Back to Square One? (R. D’Souza)

Author

Radha D’Souza

Keywords

Right to water, Human Rights, Global Justice Movements, Globalisation, Liberal Theory, Left ideology

Abstract

In the wake of the Fukuyama’s ‘end of history’: liberal theory’s triumph over its soviet/communist other, and the subsequent march of ‘globalisation’ and the ascendancy of neo-liberal ideology, this article interrogates the theoretical developments on the ‘Left’, the academic and activist led critiques of liberal triumphalism, by analysing the demands for recognition of water rights as human rights particularly in regard to the Global Justice Movements that arose from disenchantment with globalisation and with neo-liberal ideology. In the context of water-justice and human rights, the article investigates the substantial underpinnings of both liberal theory and the languages of the ‘Left’ tradition in regard to the development of the human right to water to reveal the shared foundations that divorce them both from the geo-historical terrain of emancipatory politics today.

Citation

(2008) Law, Social Justice and Global Development Journal / University of Westminster School od Law Research Paper No. 09-10

Paper

Liberal Theory, HumanRights and Water-Justice: Back to Square One?

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Dangerous Intersections: Feminism, Population and Environment (J. Silliman & Y. King)

Editor(s)

Jael Silliman and Ynestra King

Keywords

Population explosion, environmental degradation, economic development

Abstract

Dangerous Intersections provides a multicultural and international perspective on three major global problems: environmental degradation, economic development and the population ‘explosion‘. It presents crucial alternative voices and approaches to the short-sighted policies supported by the mainstream and NGOs alike – policies that focus on the fertility of poor black women – in both North and South – as the primary threat to the ecologial viability of the plant.

Citation

Jael Silliman and Ynestra King (eds), Dangerous Intersections: Feminism, Population and Environment (Zed Books, 1997)

Book

Dangerous Intersections: Feminism, Population and Environment

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Translantic Movements of Justice: A Story of Inspiration and Diversity (O.W. Pedersen)

Author

Ole Windahl Pederson

Keywords

UK , environmental justice, NGOs, grassroots, civil rights

Abstract

This paper aims to analyze environmental justice in the United Kingdom (UK) in light of the achievements of the highly successful environmental justice movement in the United States. The paper describes how the various non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and grassroots groups pursuing environmental justice aims in the UK have shaped their campaigning and methods, in spite of the lack of a civil rights movement upon which to base their work and draw inspiration from. This has forced the UK environmental justice groups to look elsewhere for inspiration and has led to a situation where the connotation of environmental justice is one of diversity and multiplicity. Nevertheless, and in spite of this diversity, the NGOs aspiring to achieve environmental justice in the UK have been successful in forcing the issue of equity and justice into the public debate and political scene in the UK.

Citation

(2009) 2 Environmental Justice 35

Paper

Translantic Movements of Justice: A Story of Inspiration and Diversity

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Teaching and learning guide for: environmental justice (J. Sze, J. London)

Author

Julie Sze and Jonathan London

Keywords

Environmental justice; environmental racism; urban; planning; public health; law; ethnic studies; public policy; social movements; environmental and social inequalities.

Abstract

Over the last 25 years, the environmental justice movement has emerged from its earliest focus on US social movements combating environmental racism to an influential global phenomenon. Environmental justice research has also undergone spectacular growth and diffusion in the last two decades. From its earliest roots in sociology, the field is now firmly entrenched in several different academic disciplines including geography, urban planning, public health, law, ethnic studies, and public policy. Environmental justice refers simultaneously to a vibrant and growing academic research field, a system of social movements aimed at addressing various environmental and social inequalities, and public policies crafted to ameliorate conditions of environmental and social injustice. Academia is responding to this social problem by offering courses under various rubrics, such as ‘Race, Poverty and the Environment, Environmental Racism, Environmental Justice’, ‘Urban Planning, Public Health And Environmental Justice’, and so on. Courses on environmental justice offer students opportunities to critically and reflexively explore issues of race and racism, social inequality, social movements, public/environmental health, public policy and law, and intersections of science and policy. Integrating modules on environmental justice can help professors engage students in action research, service learning, and more broadly, critical pedagogy.

This article offers an overview of the current state of the field and offers a range of resources for teaching concepts of environmental racism, inequality and injustice in the classroom.

Citation

(2009) 3(6) Sociology Compass, 1022-1028.

Paper

Teaching and learning guide for: environmental justice.

FacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblrmail