Category Archives: Risk

Climate Change and Energy Insecurity: The Challenge for Peace, Security … (F. Dodds, et al)

Editor(s)

Felix Dodds, Andrew Higham and Richard Sherman

Keywords

Energy Insecurity, Future Energy, Stability, Climate Change, Developing Country, Energy Consumption, Industrialised World, Oil, Europe, Nuclear Option, Bioenergy, Localised Energy Conflicts, Climate Insecurity, Challenge to Peace, Security and Development, Science, Acceptable Risk, Environment, Migration, Security, Economics, Water, Food Security, Biodiversity, New Threats, Middle East, Small Islands, Sustainable Development, Preventative Diplomacy, Multilateral System, Existing Institutions, United Nations, Security Council, Financing, Low Carbon Transition, Developing Countries, Multi-Lateral Development Banks, European Union Sub-National Climate Change Action Model, Poverty Reduction, Economic Stability, Trade Union Challenge, Corporate Response, Technology Challenge

Abstract

Climate change is now recognised as one of the greatest challenges facing the international community and when coupled with energy production and use – the most significant contributor to climate change – and the related security problems the double threat to international security and human development is of the highest order. This wide-ranging book brings together leading thinkers from academia, government and civil society to examine and address the global insecurity and development challenges arising from the twin thrust of climate change and the energy supply crunch.

Part one considers energy. It analyses the challenges of meeting future energy demands and the ongoing and future security-related conflicts over energy. Coverage includes security and development concerns related to the oil and gas, nuclear, bio-fuels and hydropower sectors, ensuring energy access for all and addressing sustainable consumption and production in both developed and rapidly industrializing countries such as India, China, Brazil and South Africa.

Part two analyses how climate change contributes to global insecurity and presents a consolidated overview of the potential threats and challenges it poses to international peace and development. Coverage includes future water scenarios including a focus on scarcity in the Middle East, food security, biodiversity loss, land degradation, the changing economics of climate change, adaptation and the special case of small island states.

The final part lays out the potential avenues and mechanisms available to the international community to address and avert climate and energy instability via the multilateral framework under the United Nations. It also addresses mechanisms for resource and knowledge transfer from industrialized to developing countries to ensure a low-carbon energy transition by focusing on the rapid deployment of clean energy technologies and ways to tackle income and employment insecurity created by the transition away from traditional energy sources.

This book offers the most comprehensive international assessment of the challenges and solutions for tackling the global insecurity arising from climate change and energy provision and use. It is essential reading for students, researchers and professionals across international relations, security, climate change and the energy sectors.

Citation

Felix Dodds, Andrew Higham and Richard Sherman (eds), Climate Change and Energy Insecurity : The Challenge for Peace, Security and Development ( Earthscan , UK /USA 2009)

Book

Climate Change and Energy Insecurity: The Challenge for Peace, Security and Development

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US border wall: breaching civil liberties and minority rights (Z. Akhtar)

Author

Zia Akhtar

Keywords

Border controls; Constitutional rights; Environmental protection; Human rights; Immigration policy; Indigenous peoples; International law; Mexico; United States

Abstract

Examines the implications of the wall and other security measures at the US-Mexico border for: (1) immigrant human rights; (2) US relations with Indian tribes; (3) US compliance with international refugee law; and (4) environmental protection.

Citation

(2010) 15(2) Coventry Law Journal 19-33

Paper

US border wall: breaching civil liberties and minority rights

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Towards a “soft law” framework for the protection of vulnerable irregular migrants (Alexander Betts)

Author

Alexander Betts

Keywords

Codes of practice; human rights; illegal entrants; internally displaced persons; vulnerable irregular migrants; refugees; environmental displacement; ‘survival migrants’; environmental disasters.

Abstract

‘Since the 1980s, an increasing number of people have crossed international borders outside of formal, regularised migration channels, whether by land, air or sea. Policy debates on these kinds of movements have generally focused on security and control, to the neglect of a focus on rights. In a range of situations, though, irregular migrants, who fall outside of the protection offered by international refugee law and UNHCR, may have protection needs and, in some cases, an entitlement to protection under international human rights law. Such protection needs may result from conditions in the country of origin or as a result of circumstances in the host or transit countries. However, this article argues that, despite the existence of international human rights norms that should, in theory, protect such people, there remains a fundamental normative and institutional gap in the international system. Rather than requiring new hard law treaties to fill the gap, the article argues that a ‘soft law’ framework should be developed to ensure the protection of vulnerable irregular migrants, based on two core elements: firstly, the consolidation and application of existing international human rights norms into sets of guiding principles for different groups; secondly, improved mechanisms for inter-agency collaboration to ensure implementation of these norms and principles. The article suggests that learning from the precedent of developing the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, and its corresponding institutional framework, could be particularly instructive in this regard.’

Citation

(2010) 22(2) International Journal of Refugee Law, 209-236.

Paper

Towards a “soft law” framework for the protection of vulnerable irregular migrants.

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Global Catastrophic Risks (N. Borstrom and M.M. Cirkovic)

Editor(s)

Nick Bostrom ( Oxford University , UK )
Milan M. Cirkovic (Astonomical Observatory, Belgrade )

Keywords

Evolution theory, humanity, catastrophes, insurance, public policy, environmental hazards, climate change, global risk, pandemics, threat of nuclear war, nuclear terrorism, biotechnology, biosecurity, nanotechnology

Abstract

Chapters from leading experts and thinkers covering some of the biggest risks facing the world today. Covers natural catastrophes, nuclear war, terrorism, biological weapons, totalitarianism, advanced nanotechnology, general artificial intelligence, and social collapse. Addresses the key methodological, ethical, and policy issues arising from the study of Global Catastrophic Risks.

A global catastrophic risk is one with the potential to wreak death and destruction on a global scale. In human history, wars and plagues have done so on more than one occasion, and misguided ideologies and totalitarian regimes have darkened an entire era or a region. Advances in technology are adding dangers of a new kind. It could happen again.

In Global Catastrophic Risks 25 leading experts look at the gravest risks facing humanity in the 21st century, including natural catastrophes, nuclear war, terrorism, global warming, biological weapons, totalitarianism, advanced nanotechnology, general artificial intelligence, and social collapse. The book also addresses over-arching issues – policy responses and methods for predicting and managing catastrophes.

This is invaluable reading for anyone interested in the big issues of our time; for students focusing on science, society, technology, and public policy; and for academics, policy-makers, and professionals working in these acutely important fields.

Citation

Nick Bostrom and Milan M. Cirkovic (eds), Global Catastrophic Risks (OUP, Oxford 2008 )

Book

Global Catastrophic Risks

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