Category Archives: Housing

Igloo As Icon: A Human Rights Approach to Climate Change for the Inuit? (J. Hohmann)

Author(s)

Jessie Hohmann

Keywords

right to housing, indigenous rights, human rights approach, climate change, cultural rights, aboriginal rights, native rights, identity, culture, cultural survival

Abstract

Global climate change has triggered a period of great instability in the Arctic. Indigenous communities are experiencing rapid social and cultural transformation: changes in the physical landscape are contributing to the relentless pressures on their traditional ways of life, which, in large part, are dependent on the persistence of snow and ice.

This paper is an exploration of what a ‘human rights approach’ to climate change can offer Inuit communities. It analyzes the potential contribution of the human right to housing, which recognizes that housing must be culturally adequate; that its location must allow access to employment and social facilities; and that certain services, materials, facilities and infrastructure must be available to the dwellers. This right takes on particular significance for the Inuit because of the iconic nature of their traditional homes and building materials and the location and climate specific nature of their ways of life. But can this right be harnessed to respond to the threats climate change poses to the ways of living of the Inuit without appealing to a static, traditional view of indigenous culture, a view that poses its own risks to the survival of their unique identity?

The paper mounts a critical analysis of the prospects and boundaries of the right to housing, so that the human rights strategies – both discursive and legal – that the Inuit are beginning to employ in the face of climate change can be pursued with greater awareness of their implications, and thus with greater prospects for success. Emerging attempts to link climate change with human rights around the globe give the issues addressed in this paper significance for other marginalized communities considering rights strategies in response to climate change, from Alaska to Bangladesh.

Citation

(2009) 18 Transnational Law and Contemporary Problems 295.

Paper

Igloo As Icon: A Human Rights Approach to Climate Change for the Inuit?

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Climate Change and Justice: Perspectives of Legal Theory (F. Ekardt)

Author(s)

Felix Ekardt

Keywords

Adaptation to Climate Change, Agriculture and Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change Convention, Climate Change and Law, Climate Law, Housing and Climate, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Development

Abstract

Climate Change and the Law is the first scholarly effort to systematically address doctrinal issues related to climate law as an emergent legal discipline. It assembles some of the most recognized experts in the field to identify relevant trends and common themes from a variety of geographic and professional perspectives.

Citation

(2013) 21 IUS Gentium 63

Paper

Climate Change and the Law

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Shelter Projects 2009 (UN-HABITAT)

Author(s)

UN-HABITAT/ The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

Keywords

Post-conflict assessment and reconstruction, Land and Housing, Risk and Disaster Management

Abstract

By the end of 2009, over 43 million people worldwide had been forcibly displaced due to conflict and persecution. In addition, during 2009, 335 reported natural disasters killed over 10,000 people and affected more than 119 million people. The corresponding scale of global shelter need has required a diversity of approaches that go beyond simple design solutions. Spanning humanitarian responses from over 60 years, Shelter Projects 2009 is the second annual compilation of shelter programmes. The project summaries included aim to illustrate some of the project options available to organisations working in both post disaster and post conflict situations, as well as to support learning from the strengths and weaknesses of different projects. The focus of this book is on projects that maximise emergency response funds to support sustainable recovery.

Citation

UN-HABITAT, Shelter Projects 2009 (UN-HABITAT/ The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, 2010)

Report

Shelter Projects 2009

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail