Category Archives: Conflict

War, terrorism and the public’s health (V. Sidel)

Author

Victor Sidel

Keywords

Civil liberties, cycle of violence, depleted uranium weapons, health infrastructure, human rights, international law, landmines, terrorism, United Nations, war effects, weapons of mass destruction

Abstract

War and terrorism, which are inseparable, cause death and disability, profound psychological damage, environmental destruction, disruption of the health infrastructure, refugee crises, and increased interpersonal, self-directed and collective violence. Weapons systems such as weapons of mass destruction and landmines have their own specific devastating effects. Preparation for war and preparedness for terrorism bring constraints on civil liberties and human rights, increase militarism, and divert resources from health care and from other needed services. War and terrorism may be best prevented through addressing their causes, which include limited resources, injustice, poverty and ethnic and religious enmity, and through strengthening the United Nations and the treaties controlling specific weapons systems, particularly weapons of mass destruction. In particular, the United States should cease its interference in the internal affairs of other nations and its advocacy of unilateral pre-emptive war.

Citation

(2008) 24 Medicine, Conflict and Survival 13-25

Paper

War, terrorism and the public’s health

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Fair Future: Resource Conflicts, Security, and Global Justice (W. Sachs and T. Santarius)

Editor(s)

Wolfgang Sachs and Tilman Santarius

Keywords

Paradigms, Resource Justice, Fair Wealth, Governance for Ecology and Fairness, Europe

Abstract

‘The world has enough for everyone’s needs, but not enough for everyone’s greed.’ – Mahatma Gandhi

Oil crisis, water conflicts, declining food security – we hear one report after another about resource scarcity – while with growing populations and huge poverty, nations are demanding their right to development. In the age of globalization this right cannot be disputed, yet the planet is already exhibiting signs of acute environmental stress. Indians want more roads and Chinese more oil: the struggle over nature will partly shape the crises of the twenty-first century. Clashes over resources, both major and minor, are often the unseen factor behind chaos and violence and it is vital to start thinking about how the distribution of resources can be made more just.

This book, written by specialists from the internationally renowned Wuppertal Institute, provides an account of what is involved in the resource conflicts of today and tomorrow. It puts forwards perspectives for resource justice and outlines a global economic and environmental policy equally committed to nature and to humanity.

This new work, rich in analysis and information, offers a compass to anyone looking for ways in which global society might face the challenge of the future.

Citation

Wolfgang Sachs and Tilman Santarius (eds), Fair Future: Resource Conflicts, Security, and Global Justice (Zed Books, 2007)

Book

Fair Future: Resource Conflicts, Security, and Global Justice

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Facing Down the Hydro-Crisis (P. Gleick)

Author

Peter Gleick

Keywords

Global water crisis, climate change, increasing demand, shrinking supply, transboundary water management, international arbiters, conflicts

Abstract

Peter Gleick warns of a global water crisis “of a magnitude unlike any before in human history.” Shrinking supply, increasing demand, and climate change create an unprecedented urgency to act. Gleick lays out a series of proposals to address what he calls “the most critical resource issue facing humanity.” Avoiding a perpetual water crisis will require creative and innovative strategies to better harness the economic value of water, increase efficiency, and improve standards–through national commitments toward green building and rainwater harvesting. But across borders, writes Gleick, we need stronger water-management institutions and international arbiters to help avoid the cascade of impending conflicts over this diminishing resource.

Citation

(2009/2010) 26 World Policy Journal 17-23

Paper

Facing Down the Hydro-Crisis

Blog Post

Facing Down the Hydro-Crisis

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A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment (J. Garbarino & G. Sigman)

Editors(s)

James Garbarino and Garry Sigman

Keywords

Adversity, Child Abuse, Child Maltreatment, Child Neglect, Child Psychopathology, Child Welfare, Childhood Trauma, Children and Trauma, Children’s Rights, Criminal Justice, Environment, Gun Violence, Healthy Environment, Human Rights of Children, Loyola University Chicago’s Center for the Human Rights of C, Loyola University Symposium on the Human Rights of Children, Pediatric Obesity, Resilience, Toxic Environment, Trauma, Violence Prevention

Abstract

It’s a startling reality that more American children are victims—and perpetrators—of violence than those of any other developed country. Yet unlike the other nations, the United States has yet to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Compelling, readable, and interdisciplinary, A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment provides an abundance of skilled observation, important findings, and keen insights to place children’s well-being in the vanguard of human rights concerns, both in the United States and globally. Within this volume, authors examine the impediments to the crucial goals of justice, safety, dignity, well-being, and meaning in children’s lives, factors as varied as socioeconomic stressors, alienated, disengaged parents, and corrosive moral lessons from the media. The complex role of religious institutions in promoting and, in many cases, curtailing children’s rights is analyzed, as are international efforts by advocates and policymakers to address major threats to children’s development, including: • War and natural disasters. • Environmental toxins (e.g., malaria and lead poisoning). • The child obesity epidemic. • Gun violence. • Child slavery and trafficking. • Toxic elements in contemporary culture. A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment is a powerful call to action for researchers and professionals in developmental, clinical child, school, and educational psychology as well as psychiatry, pediatrics, social work, general and special education, sociology, and other fields tasked with improving children’s lives.

Citation

James Garbarino and Garry Sigman (eds), A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment (Springer, 2010)

Book

A Child’s Right to a Healthy Environment

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Can Economic Incentives Resolve Conservation Conflict (D.C. MacMillan and S. Phillip)

Author(s)

Douglas Craig MacMillan (University of Kent, UK)
Sharon Phillip (University of Aberdeen, UK)

Keywords

Economic incentives, biodiversity, conservation conflict, red deer

Abstract

Market-based economic incentives are increasingly perceived as a cost-effective approach to biodiversity conservation but empirical evidence to substantiate this claim is lacking. Using both qualitative and quantitative data analysis this paper investigates the potential role of market incentives to increase venison production as a mechanism to resolve conflicts over wild red deer management in the Scottish Highlands. Our analysis suggests the approach is unlikely to be effective because investments in venison production would bring conflict with more important non-pecuniary objectives of landownership such as ‘sporting quality’ and ‘exclusivity’. At a broader level we urge caution when considering the deployment of economic instruments to resolve contemporary conservation conflicts where profit maximisation is not the dominant objective and/or where the target group is extremely wealthy.

Citation

(20 May 2010) Human Ecology Online

Paper

Can Economic Incentives Resolve Conservation Conflict: The Case of Wild Deer Management and Habitat Conservation in the Scottish Highlands

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