Category Archives: Children’s Rights

‘Environmental Rights of the Child in India’ in The Rights of the Child to a Clean Environment (M. Anderson and S. Bluck)

Author(s)

Michael Anderson and Sylvia Bluck

Keywords

children’s rights, clean environment, human rights, India

Abstract

A discussion on the right of a child to a clean environment, linking two contemporary issues: human rights and the environment. It consists of the extended versions of some of the papers which were presented at a workshop held at Queen Mary and Westfield College, London, in 1997.

Citation

‘Environmental Rights of the Child in India’ in The Rights of the Child to a Clean Environment 105 (Agata Fijalkowski and M. Fitzmaurice eds., 2000)

Paper

The Rights of the Child to a Clean Environment

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Atmospheric Justice: A Political Theory of Climate Change (S. Vanderheiden)

Author

Steve Vanderheiden

Keywords

Climate change, international climate policy, environmental threat, justice, mitigation

Abstract

When the policies and activities of one country or generation harm both other nations and later generations, they constitute serious injustices. Recognizing the broad threat posed by anthropogenic climate change, advocates for an international climate policy development process have expressly aimed to mitigate this pressing contemporary environmental threat in a manner that promotes justice. Yet, while making justice a primary objective of global climate policy has been the movement’s noblest aspiration, it remains an onerous challenge for policymakers.

Atmospheric Justice is the first single-authored work of political theory that addresses this pressing challenge via the conceptual frameworks of justice, equality, and responsibility. Throughout this incisive study, Steve Vanderheiden points toward ways to achieve environmental justice by exploring how climate change raises issues of both international and intergenerational justice. In addition, he considers how the design of a global climate regime might take these aims into account. Engaging with the principles of renowned political philosopher John Rawls, he expands on them by factoring in the needs of future generations. Vanderheiden also demonstrates how political theory can contribute to reaching a better understanding of the proper human response to climate change. By showing how climate policy offers insights into resolving contemporary controversies within political theory, he illustrates the ways in which applying normative theory to policy allows us to better understand both.

Thoroughly researched and persuasively argued, Atmospheric Justice makes an important step toward providing us with a set of carefully elaborated first principles for achieving environmental justice.

Citation

Steve Vanderheiden, Atmospheric Justice: A Political Theory of Climate Change ( OUP , USA 2009)

Book

Atmospheric Justice: A Political Theory of Climate Change

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Environment, Human Rights and International Trade (F. Francioni)

Author

Francesco Francioni

Keywords

Uruguay Round; International trade law; WTO process; GMOs; biosafety; intellectual property rights; technology transfer; environmental protection; trade and labour rights; child labour standards

Abstract

After the completion of the Uruguay Round and the adoption of the 1994 agreement establishing the WTO, the place of international trade in the context of the international legal order has radically changed. International trade law has become a subject of wide-spread interest, cutting across traditional boundaries, and engaging diverse political and legal concerns. One consequence of this development is increasing concern with the legitimacy of the WTO process, which in turn has led to the WTO becoming the focus of rancorous protest by, among others, environmental NGOs, trade unions, and human rights activists. This collection of essays by leading scholars and lawyers engaged in the policy-making process, addresses the underlying tensions and dilemmas of the WTO process and its impact upon the environment and human rights in particular. The contributors search for a balance between, on the one hand, legitimate free trade interests and, on the other, the role and limits of unilateral measures as an instrument to protect non-commercial values. The essays thus range over a host of topical questions including: trade in GMOs, biosafety in intellectual property rights, technology transfer and environmental protection, trade and labour rights, child labour standards, the EU and WTO, MERCOSUR, and many other topics. The contributors include: Thomas Schoenbaum, Andrea Bianchi, Chris McCrudden, Michael Spence, Sarah Cleveland, Patricia Hansen, Riccardo Pavoni, and Francesco Francioni.

Citation

Francesco Francioni, Environment, Human Rights and International Trade (Hart, 2001)

Book

Environment, Human Rights and International Trade

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Global Obligations for the Right to Food (G. Kent)

Editor

George Kent

Keywords

Children, human rights, right to food

Abstract

A child may be born into a poor country, but not a poor world. If global human rights are to be meaningful, they must be universal. Global Obligations for the Right to Food assesses the nature and depth of the global responsibility to provide adequate food to the world’s population.

While governments have a primary responsibility for assuring the right to food for people under national jurisdictions, we as a global community are all responsible. Global Obligations for the Right to Food explores the various actions that should be taken by governments, non-governmental organizations, and individuals to ensure that citizens of the world have access to adequate food.

Citation

George Kent (ed), Global Obligations for the Right to Food (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008)

Book

Global Obligations for the Right to Food

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Governance instruments that protect children’s environmental health… (D. Spady et al)

Author

Donald Spady

Nola Ries

Brian D. Ladd

Irena Buka

Alvaro Roman Osornio-Vargas

Colin L. Soskolne

Keywords

Canada; children’s rights ; EC law; environmental health; foetus; hazardous substances; pollutants; United States.

Abstract

Reviews legislation and guidelines in the OECD countries of the EU and in the US on the protection of children’s environmental health, including that of the foetus, to assess the lessons that might be learned by Canada. Examines the extent to which the health effects on children have been specifically addressed in legislation governing environmental exposure to chemicals and pollutants. Notes the gaps identified in the regulation, research base and funding, and harmonisation of laws.

Citation

(2008) 10(3) Environmental Law Review, 200-217.

Paper

Governance instruments that protect children’s environmental health: is enough being done?

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