Tag Archives: sustainable development

Upcoming Seminar: Fourth Annual Rule of Law and Sustainable Development Seminar

On the 13th of April 2018 the Regional African Law and Human Security Programme (RALHUS), at UWC, in conjunction with the South African Research Chair in International Law, at UJ, will host the Fourth Annual Rule of Law and Sustainable Development Seminar, in Stellenbosch, South Africa.

The topic of the seminar is The International Climate Change Regime, Modern Sustainable Energy and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Goal 13 of Agenda 2030 mandates states to “take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts’”. SDG 13 affirms that the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change. Reciprocal acknowledgement of the SDGs by the UNFCCC regime can be found in Decision 1/CP.21 adopted at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP) where the COP welcomed the adoption of the SDGs, in particular Goal 13. The Paris Agreement provides for several mechanisms to address climate change in order to further sustainable development and SDG 13. As such the preamble of the Paris Agreement explicitly acknowledges “the need to promote universal access to sustainable energy in developing countries, in particular in Africa, through the enhanced development of renewable energy”. Furthermore, the UNFCCC refers to energy efficiency in its preamble as a measure to counteract increasing energy consumption. These references lend considerable support to SDG 7 on sustainable energy, in particular targets 7.1 and 7.2 and the potential that the climate change regime has to induce sustainable energy projects.

Please contact Werner Scholtz (wscholtz@uwc.ac.za) for further information.

Feature image: Josh Gellers

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Unraveling the Nagoya Protocol: A Commentary on the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-sharing to the Convention on Biological Diversity (E. Morgera et al.)

Author(s)

Elisa Morgera, Elsa Tsioumani, Matthias Buck

Keywords

access, benefit-sharing, environmental sustainability, sustainable development, international law, human rights, intellectual property rights, health, food, oceans

Abstract

The Nagoya Protocol on access and benefit-sharing is an international environmental agreement that concerns environmental sustainability, other sustainable development issues and equity. It addresses a complex subject matter that affects a range of research, development and commercial activities and is relevant to different areas of international law such as human rights, intellectual property rights, health, food and oceans.

Unraveling the Nagoya Protocol identifies textual, contextual and systemic interpretative questions and suggests solutions that aim to give a coherent and balanced meaning to the text of the Protocol. Offering a systematic discussion of the Protocol’s legal innovations against the background of general international law, this commentary aims to be of use to international biodiversity law scholars and practitioners, as well as to international lawyers that approach access and benefit-sharing for the first time

Citation

E. Morgera et al. 2014. Unraveling the Nagoya Protocol: A Commentary on the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-sharing to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Martinus Nijhoff.

Paper

Unraveling the Nagoya Protocol: A Commentary on the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-sharing to the Convention on Biological Diversity

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The Right to Environment and Sustainable Development as a Principle of International Law (N. Singh)

Author

N. Singh

Keywords

Right to Environment, Sustainable Development, International Law

Abstract

None available

Citation

(1997) in La Droit a la Qualité de L’Environment: un Droit Endevenir, un Droit a Definir, N. Duple (Ed.)

Paper

Not available online

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Globalization, Environmental Justice, and Sustainable Development: The Case of Oil (Hymel)

Author

Monica L Hymel

Keywords

Energy, environment, tax, oil, environmental justice, sustainable development

Abstract

As globalization expands, poverty abounds, the environment suffers, and scientists warn of the devastation to come as earth’s temperature rises. Likewise, the last century has seen a dramatic increase in the human lifespan and life comforts. People travel the world with ease and comfort – unimaginable even 60 years ago. Oil plays a pivotal role in these problems and accomplishments. However, oil consumption has dramatically damaged our environment. Power struggles over controlling oil threaten global security. This paper discusses the economics of oil in the context of globalization, environmental justice, and sustainable development. The paper analyzes policies that have resulted in oil’s world dominance, and those policies needed to break oil’s hold on the global economy.

Citation

(2006) Macquarie Law Review; Arizona Legal Studies Discussion Paper No. 06-38.

Publication

Globalization, Environmental Justice, and Sustainable Development: The Case of Oil

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Environmental Justice and International Environmental Law (Gonzalez)

Author

Carmen G Gonzalez

Keywords

Environmental justice, sustainable development, equity, ethics, colonialism, post-colonialism, special and differential treatment, common but differentiated responsibility, ecological debt, climate change, human rights, environmental human rights, Aarhus Convention, transnational corporations

Abstract

Environmental justice lies at the heart of many environmental disputes between the global North and the global South as well as grassroots environmental struggles within nations. However, the discourse of international environmental law is often ahistorical and technocratic. It neither educates the North about its inordinate contribution to global environmental problems nor provides an adequate response to the concerns of nations and communities disproportionately burdened by poverty and environmental degradation. This article examines some of the root causes of environmental injustice among and within nations from the colonial period to the present, and discusses several strategies that can be used to integrate environmental justice into the broader corpus of international law so as to promote social and economic justice while protecting the planet’s natural resources for the benefit of present and future generations.

Citation

Shawkat Alam, Jahid Hossain Bhuiyan, Tareq M R Chowdhury, Erika Techera (eds.),ROUTLEDGE HANDBOOK OF INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (Routledge, 2013); Seattle University School of Law Research Paper No. 12-11.

Publication

Environmental Justice and International Environmental Law

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