Tag Archives: risk

Human Rights and Global Climate Change (S. Caney)

Author(s)

Simon Caney

Keywords

human rights, fossil fuels, injustice, cosmopolitanism,  climate change, risk, uncertainty, protection, morality, time, temporal

Abstract

Is it possible and desirable to translate the basic principles underlying cosmopolitanism as a moral standard into effective global institutions. Will the ideals of inclusiveness and equal moral concern for all survive the marriage between cosmopolitanism and institutional power? What are the effects of such bureaucratisation of cosmopolitan ideals? This volume examines the strained relationship between cosmopolitanism as a moral standard and the legal institutions in which cosmopolitan norms and principles are to be implemented. Five areas of global concern are analysed: environmental protection, economic regulation, peace and security, the fight against international crimes and migration.

In this paper, the author argues that climate change jeopardizes a number of fundamental human rights.

Citation

Simon Caney, ‘Human Rights and Global Climate Change’ in: Ronald Pierik and Wouter Werner eds., Cosmopolitanism in Context: Perspectives from International Law and Political Theory (Cambridge University Press, 2010)

Paper

‘Human Rights and Global Climate Change’ in Cosmopolitanism in Context: Perspectives from International Law and Political Theory

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Environmental migration & cities in the context of global environmental change (S.B. Adamo)

Author

Susana B. Adamo

Keywords

Environment, environmental migration, cities, migration inflows, GEC impacts, risk, secondary migration, displacement

Abstract

There is a renewed interest in environmental migration and displacement that is fueled by concerns about the impacts of global environmental change on human populations. Regardless on-going debates about magnitudes and definitions, recent research on the topic shows a complex picture where environmental events are rarely the only drivers, several factors — among them the characteristics of the event and the degree of vulnerability — influence the outcome, and different types of mobility can be distinguished. Within this framework and in the context of global processes, research on the interactions among cities, environmental migration and GEC present two interrelated perspectives. On the one hand, cities are increasingly exposed to the impacts of GEC events, which can trigger environmental migration to other regions. On the other hand, they are the most common destinations of migration inflows, and environmental change outside of cities can exacerbate the influx of migrants to cities. The case of New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina dramatically illustrates these issues, highlighting the policy and governance dimensions.

Citation

(2010) Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 2(3), 161–165

Paper

Environmental migration and cities in the context of global environmental change

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Anchoring Homes, UN-HABITAT’s People’s Process in Aceh & Nias after the Tsunami (UN-HABITAT/UNDP)

Author(s)

UN-HABITAT/UNDP

Keywords

Participation, Natural disasters, Risk, Adaptation, Mitigation

Abstract

Rebuilding personal and collective confidences through a participatory process takes time, especially amidst the massive personal tragedy of lost loved ones, personal assets and livelihoods. This photo and film documentation is testimony of all that we have all learned during the past two years. As a testimony, we hope it can be an inspiring tool for any person or institution overcoming a future disaster.

Citation

UN-HABITAT/UNDP, Anchoring Homes, UN-HABITAT’s People’s Process in Aceh and Nias after the Tsunami(UN-HABITAT/UNDP, 2007)

Report

Anchoring Homes, UN-HABITAT’s People’s Process in Aceh and Nias after the Tsunami

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The regulatory challenge of animal cloning for food – the risks of risk regulation in the European Union (M. Weimer)

Author

Maria Weimer

Keywords

Food, European Union, Science, Cloning, EU law, Ethics, Food, Genetically modified organisms, Regulation, Risk;, Scientific uncertainty, United States

Abstract

Examines the debate in the EU on the appropriate regulatory response to the marketing of food produced from cloned animals, a practice on the verge of commercialisation in the global food market, particularly in the US. Reviews the current state of political, scientific and public opinion in the EU on the ethics and safety of animal cloning. Discusses the European Commission’s proposed reforms to Regulation 258/97 (Novel Foods Regulation) to extend its scope to food products from cloned animals. Considers the likelihood that this regulation will prove as controversial as the EU response to genetically modified organisms.

Citation

(2010) 1(1) European Journal of Risk Regulation 31-39

Paper

The regulatory challenge of animal cloning for food – the risks of risk regulation in the European Union

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