Tag Archives: responsibility

Critical Reflections on Ownership (M. Warnock)

Author(s)

Mary Warnock

Keywords

ownership, gardens, Locke, Hume, philosophy, private ownership, common ownership, property, responsibility, global environmental degradation, Romantic Movement, nature

Abstract

In this thought provoking work, Mary Warnock explores what it is to own things, and the differences in our attitude to what we own and what we do not. Starting from the philosophical standpoints of Locke and Hume, the ownership of gardens is presented as a prime example, exploring both private and common ownership, historically and autobiographically. The author concludes that, besides pleasure and pride, ownership brings a sense of responsibility for what is owned and a fundamental question is brought to light: can we feel the same responsibility for what we do not, and never can, own? Applying this question to the natural world and the planet as a whole, a realistic and gradualist perspective is offered on confronting global environmental degradation. Critical Reflections on Ownership examines the effect of the Romantic Movement on our attitudes to nature and is a salient commentary on the history of ideas.

Citation

Warnock, Mary (2015) Critical Reflections on Ownership. Cheltenham: Elgar

Paper

Critical Reflections on Ownership

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Human Rights Violations and Climate Change: The Last Days of the Inuit People? (S. Nuffer)

Author

Sarah Nuffer

Keywords

human rights violations, climate change, Inuit, Arctic, vulnerability, responsibility, future generations, United Nations, native groups, indigenous people

Excerpt

INTRODUCTION

The climate is changing. There is little debate left with regard to this statement. However, the world is still grappling with what exactly this change means. The Secretary General of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon, recently stated that he is “convinced that climate change, and what we do about it, will define us, our era, and ultimately the global legacy we leave for future generations.” 3 Global Climate Change (“GCC”) has the potential to affect the world’s most developed groups, however, the people whose lives will likely be changed most by GCC are those who have “contribute[d] the least to greenhouse emissions.” 4

One of the groups that will be most affected by GCC are the Inuit of the Arctic region. There is a large degree of certainty that the Arctic’s climate is changing and as a result the Inuit people are being forced to change their way of life, their cultural identity, and in some cases, they are being forced to leave their ancestral lands. While the Inuit people must pay the “highest price … [and] are directly threatened by these rapid climatic changes” 5 because of their traditional way of life, they contributed little to GCC. This unfortunate paradigm, that those most affected by GCC are not responsible for its creation, is a theme that runs tragically true for many native people that lead a traditional and near carbon-free life. This Note will explore the effects of GCC on the Inuit people …

Citation

(2010) 37 Rutgers Law Record 182.

Paper

Human Rights Violations and Climate Change: The Last Days of the Inuit People?

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The Intersection of Human Rights and Environmental Protection in the European Court of Human Rights (M. Acevedo)

Author

Mariana Acevedo

Keywords

Human rights, environmental protection, EU, European Court of Human Rights, responsibility

Abstract

In recent years, the evolution of a consensus regarding the need to address environmental protection issues has generated significant debate in the international community regarding who should bear responsibility for environmental harm. 1 One forum for this debate is the European Court of Human Rights (Court). The Court’s willingness to recognize the nexus between environmental protection and human rights in its latest environmental decisions reflects a growing recognition of the importance of environmental issues, specifically the quality of the environment, and the need for protection against and information about environmental threats. 2 In the landmark decision Guerra & Others v. Italy, the Court held that Italy failed to respect the applicant’s right to privacy and family life in breach of Article 8 of the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (Convention), by not providing essential information which would have enabled the applicants to assess the environmental risks of living in proximity to a chemical factory.

Citation

(2000) 8 N.Y.U. Environmental Law Journal 437-495.

Paper

The Intersection of Human Rights and Environmental Protection in the European Court of Human Rights 

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Human Rights and the Environment: In Search of a New Relationship. Synergies and Common Themes (E Grant, L. J. Kotzé, K Morrow)

Authors

Evadne Grant, Louis J. Kotzé, Karen Morrow

Keywords

Onati, re-imagining, human rights and the environment, new framework, themes and insights, vulnerability, the limits of law, the limits of rights, responsibility, interconnection, thinking ecologically

Abstract

The 2012 Oñati Workshop on Human Rights and the Environment sought to begin the important task of developing a new framework that could contribute to re-imagining the relationship between human rights and the environment. Doing full justice to the vibrant and sustained discussion that took place in response to the papers delivered in the Workshop is near impossible in an ex post facto account that can only convey the merest flavour of the richness and complexity of what took place. Nonetheless, the following sections briefly recollect common themes and valuable insights that emerged during the workshop discussions and attempt to reflect the energy and creativity that accompanied them, with a view to setting out the general context within which the various individual papers in this volume should be considered. We have arranged the subsequent discussion to centre on the core discrete yet interrelated themes that emerged and developed during our workshop deliberations, namely: vulnerability; the limits of the law; the limits of rights; responsibility; interconnection; and thinking ecologically.

Citation

(2013) 3/5 Onati Socio-Legal Series 953-965

Paper

Human Rights and the Environment: In Search of a New Relationship. Synergies and Common Themes

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The Environmental Responsibility Reader (M.Reynolds, et al)

Editor(s)

Martin Reynolds, Chris Blackmore and Mark J. Smith

Keywords

Environmental issues, modern environmental problems

Abstract

The Environmental Responsibility Reader is a definitive collection of classic and contemporary environmental works that offers a comprehensive overview of the issues involved in environmental responsibility, steering the reader through each development in thought with a unifying and expert editorial voice.

This essential text expertly explores seemingly intractable modern-day environmental dilemmas – including climate change, fossil fuel consumption, fresh water quality, industrial pollution, habitat destruction, and biodiversity loss. Starting with “Silent Spring” and moving through to more recent works the book draws on contemporary ideas of environmental ethics, corporate social responsibility, ecological justice, fair trade, global citizenship, and the connections between environmental and social justice; configuring these ideas into practical notions for responsible action with a unique global and integral focus on responsibility.

Citation

Martin Reynolds, Chris Blackmore and Mark J. Smith (eds), The Environmental Responsibility Reader (Zed Books, 2009)

Book

The Environmental Responsibility Reader

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