Tag Archives: philosophy

Critical Reflections on Ownership (M. Warnock)

Author(s)

Mary Warnock

Keywords

ownership, gardens, Locke, Hume, philosophy, private ownership, common ownership, property, responsibility, global environmental degradation, Romantic Movement, nature

Abstract

In this thought provoking work, Mary Warnock explores what it is to own things, and the differences in our attitude to what we own and what we do not. Starting from the philosophical standpoints of Locke and Hume, the ownership of gardens is presented as a prime example, exploring both private and common ownership, historically and autobiographically. The author concludes that, besides pleasure and pride, ownership brings a sense of responsibility for what is owned and a fundamental question is brought to light: can we feel the same responsibility for what we do not, and never can, own? Applying this question to the natural world and the planet as a whole, a realistic and gradualist perspective is offered on confronting global environmental degradation. Critical Reflections on Ownership examines the effect of the Romantic Movement on our attitudes to nature and is a salient commentary on the history of ideas.

Citation

Warnock, Mary (2015) Critical Reflections on Ownership. Cheltenham: Elgar

Paper

Critical Reflections on Ownership

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Human Rights and the Environment: In Search of a New Relationship (A Grear)

Editor

Anna Grear

Keywords

GNHRE, human rights, environment, philosophy, legal doctrine, policy, praxis, activism, new framework for human rights and the environment

Abstract

This collection of papers searches for a new framework for conceptualising the complex nexus between human rights and the environment. Drawing together philosophy, legal doctrine, policy, praxis and activism, the papers reflect a workshop at the Onati International Institute for the Sociology of Law with members of the GNHRE network.

Citation

(2013) 3/5 Onati Socio-Legal Series 796-990

Journal Edition

Human Rights and the Environment: In Search of a New Relationship

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Towards a New Horizon: in Search of a Renewing Socio-Juridical Imaginary (A Grear)

Author

Anna Grear

Keywords

Onati, philosophy, doctrine, policy, praxis, activism, new relationship, new socio-juridical imaginary

Abstract

This chapter offers one passing presentation of the goal that the Oñati workshop set out towards. It is an attempt to draw together threads of philosophy, doctrine, policy, praxis and activism as an uneven thread in a far wider, urgent conversation bringing human rights and the environment into a new relationship. This new relationship necessarily requires, as I argue below, a radical worldview transformation inaugurating a new ‘human’ subjectivity and, inseparably, a new socio-juridical imaginary reflecting a new vision of ‘the world’.

Citation

(2013) 3/5 Onati Socio-Legal Series 966-990

Paper

Towards a New Horizon: in Search of a Renewing Socio-Juridical Imaginary

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Human Rights and the Environment: in Search of a New Relationship: Editor’s Introduction (A Grear)

Author

Anna Grear

Keywords

Human rights, environment, new relationship, philosophy, legal doctrine, policy, praxis, activism, GNHRE, Onati

Abstract

The 2012 Onati Workshop, ‘Human Rights and the Environment: In Search of a New Relationship’, began to trace out a new, imaginative and paradigm-challenging framework calling on philosophy, legal doctrine, policy, praxis and activism and drawing them together in a coherent, but non-monolithic new socio-juridical approach to the important relationship between human rights and the environment. The workshop was part of the on-going work of the Global Network for the Study of Human Rights and Environment (GNHRE) – the largest existing network of scholars in the world specifically addressing the important nexus between human rights as the dominant global language of ethical claim and the ‘environment’. In short, the GNHRE workshop at Onati developed the on-going efforts of the GNHRE network and its partners to contribute to the important task of re-imagining the human relationship with the living world. We were incredibly fortunate to be awarded an International Workshop by the Onati Institute for the Sociology of Law – and the papers in this collection were, in the main, presented as part of the workshop. The others (by Grear; and by Morrow, Kotze and Grant) were written later, in the light of the conversations and notes taken at the Workshop, and represent a weaving together of insights and provocations emerging from the rich discussions taking place in June 2012 in Onati, Spain.

Citation

(2013) 3/5 Oñati Socio-Legal Series 796-814

Paper

Human Rights and the Environment: in Search of a New Relationship

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Atmospheric Justice: A Political Theory of Climate Change (S. Vanderheiden)

Author

Steve Vanderheiden

Keywords

Climate change, international climate policy, environmental threat, justice, mitigation

Abstract

When the policies and activities of one country or generation harm both other nations and later generations, they constitute serious injustices. Recognizing the broad threat posed by anthropogenic climate change, advocates for an international climate policy development process have expressly aimed to mitigate this pressing contemporary environmental threat in a manner that promotes justice. Yet, while making justice a primary objective of global climate policy has been the movement’s noblest aspiration, it remains an onerous challenge for policymakers.

Atmospheric Justice is the first single-authored work of political theory that addresses this pressing challenge via the conceptual frameworks of justice, equality, and responsibility. Throughout this incisive study, Steve Vanderheiden points toward ways to achieve environmental justice by exploring how climate change raises issues of both international and intergenerational justice. In addition, he considers how the design of a global climate regime might take these aims into account. Engaging with the principles of renowned political philosopher John Rawls, he expands on them by factoring in the needs of future generations. Vanderheiden also demonstrates how political theory can contribute to reaching a better understanding of the proper human response to climate change. By showing how climate policy offers insights into resolving contemporary controversies within political theory, he illustrates the ways in which applying normative theory to policy allows us to better understand both.

Thoroughly researched and persuasively argued, Atmospheric Justice makes an important step toward providing us with a set of carefully elaborated first principles for achieving environmental justice.

Citation

Steve Vanderheiden, Atmospheric Justice: A Political Theory of Climate Change ( OUP , USA 2009)

Book

Atmospheric Justice: A Political Theory of Climate Change

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