Tag Archives: international relations

The Roots of Influence: Nongovernmental Organizations and the Relationship Between Human Rights and the Environment (C. Tracy)

Author

Christopher Tracy

Keywords

NGOs, non-governmental organisations, human rights, environment, dignity, future generations, indigenous right, environmental protection, Rio, legitimacy, international relations

Extract

“Part I of this Article will address the history and development of NGOs. Particular attention will be given to the rationale espoused by various NGOs for their participation in certain global concerns or activities. The connections between human rights and environment NGOs will be discussed, as will the reason for this connection – namely, a “dignity” concern for living human beings, the living plant, those yet to be born and the future of this world. This connection between human rights and environmental organizations is most evident in the protection of indigenous peoples and their traditional lands.

Part II will continue the discussion by examining links between human rights and the environmental in international instruments. Although, there have been numerous connections made in previous human rights and environmental documents, the focus here will be on the developments made in Rio.

Part III will examine the tensions arising out of attempts to prioritize when human rights and environment concerns are to be addressed […]

Part IV will suggest that the NGOs’ diverse participation should continue well into the future before any major prioritization will have to occur. […]

This discussion will conclude with the suggestion that NGO involvement in the international regime will continue to grow and, as it does, a balance must be sought between legitimacy in action and vitality in mission” (pp. 24-25)

Citation

(1994) Journal of International Law and Practice 3 pp. 21-46

Paper

The Roots of Influence: Nongovernmental Organizations and the Relationship Between Human Rights and the Environment

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Explaining the emergence of constitutional environmental rights: a global quantitative analysis (Gellers)

Author

Joshua C Gellers

Keywords

Constitutions, democracy, environmental rights, human rights, international relations, survival analysis

Abstract

While the growing trend towards constitutional enactment of environmental rights has mainly been discussed in normative and descriptive terms, few scholars have endeavoured to explain the phenomenon in a systematic fashion and none have approached the subject from the perspective of international relations (IR). In this article, I seek to correct for this theoretical gap and augment the existing understanding of this global development in constitutional design. Using survival analysis, I examine normative, rationalist-materialist, and domestic politics explanations for the phenomenon observed. I find that the adoption of constitutional environmental rights is significantly associated with international civil society influence, human rights legacy, and level of democracy, and best explained by theories of domestic politics and norm socialization. This research suggests that the emergence of constitutional environmental rights signals a major shift in the international normative arena.

Citation

(2015) 1 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 75-97

Publication

Explaining the emergence of constitutional environmental rights: a global quantitative analysis

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Climate Change, Human Rights and Moral Thresholds (S. Caney)

Author(s)

Simon Caney

Keywords

frameworks, impacts of climate change, human rights-centered analysis, cost-benefit, security-based analyses, right to life, right to health, right to subsistence, ethics, anthropogenic climate change, violation of rights, policy, mitigation, adaptation, compensation, international relations, vulnerability

Abstract

EXTRACT:

“I argue that:

1. Climate change jeopardizes some key human rights.

2. A “human-rights”-centered analysis of the impacts of climate change enjoys several fundamental advantages over other dominant ways of thinking about climate change.

3. A “human-rights”-centered analysis of the impacts of climate change has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the kind of action that should be taken and who should bear the costs of combating climate change.”

Citation

Simon Caney, ‘Climate Change, Human Rights and Moral Thresholds’ in: Gardner et al., eds., Climate Ethics (Oxford University Press, 2010)

Paper

‘Climate Change’, Human Rights and Moral Thresholds’ in Climate Ethics

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New Norms and Knowledge in World Politics: Protecting People, Intellectual Property and the Environment (P. Stoeva)

Author

Preslava Stoeva

Keywords

Norms, international politics, international relations, environment, climate change, protection from torture, intellectual property rights

Abstract

This book examines the process of norm development and knowledge creation in international politics, and assesses these processes in case studies on protection from torture, intellectual property rights and climate change.

Drawing on the theories of constructivism and the sociology of scientific knowledge, author Preslava Stoeva demonstrates that international norms are a product of a sequence of closures and consensus reached at different social levels. She contends that it is this process which makes norms permeate the social and political fabric of international relations even before they become official principles of state behaviour. Proposing a theoretical model which indicates the stages of the development of norms, she studies the roles that various actors play in that process, together with the interplay of various types of power. Through this endeavour, this book succeeds in providing the reader with a better understanding of the social processes that lead to normative change in international relations.

New Norms and Knowledge in World Politics will be of interest to students, scholars and practitioners of international relations, comparative politics, globalization, sociology and anthropology.

Citation

Preslava Stoeva, New Norms and Knowledge in World Politics: Protecting People, Intellectual Property and the Environment (Taylor & Francis, 2009)

Book

New Norms and Knowledge in World Politics: Protecting People, Intellectual Property and the Environment

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Global Environmental Change and Human Security (R.A. Matthew, et al)

Editors(s)

Richard A. Matthew, Jon Barnett, Bryan McDonald, Karen L. O’Brien

Keywords

National security, human security, environmental change

Abstract

In recent years, scholars in international relations and other fields have begun to conceive of security more broadly, moving away from a state-centered concept of national security toward the idea of human security, which emphasises individual and human well-being. Viewing global environmental change through the lens of human security connects such problems as melting ice caps and carbon emissions to poverty, vulnerability, equity, and conflict. This book examines the complex social, health, and economic consequences of environmental change across the globe.

In chapters that are both academically rigorous and policy relevant, the book discusses the connections of global environmental change to urban poverty, natural disasters (with a case study of Hurricane Katrina), violent conflict (with a study of the decade-long Nepalese civil war), population, gender, and development. The book makes clear the inadequacy of traditional understandings of security and shows how global environmental change is raising new, unavoidable questions of human insecurity, conflict, cooperation, and sustainable development.

Contributors: W. Neil Adger, Jennifer Bailey, Jon Barnett, Victoria Basolo, Hans Georg Bohle, Mike Brklacich, May Chazan, Chris Cocklin, Geoffrey D. Dabelko, Indra de Soysa, Heather Goldsworthy, Betsy Hartmann, Robin M. Leichenko, Laura Little, Alexander López, Richard A. Matthew, Bryan McDonald, Eric Neumayer, Kwasi Nsiah-Gyabaah, Karen L. O’Brien, Marvin S. Soroos, Bishnu Raj Upreti

Citation

Richard A. Matthew, et al (eds), Global Environmental Change and Human Security (MIT Press, USA 2009)

Book

Global Environmental Change and Human Security

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