Tag Archives: global environmental governance

A Global Environmental Right (S. J. Turner)

Author

Stephen J. Turner

Keywords

Environmental Rights, Global Environmental Governance, Constitutional Law, Company Law, Trade Law, Non-State Actors, Climate Change Law

Abstract

The development of an international substantive environmental right on a global level has long been a contested issue. To a limited extent environmental rights have developed in a fragmented way through different legal regimes. This book examines the potential for the development of a global environmental right that would create legal duties for all types of decision-makers and provide the bedrock for a new system of international environmental governance. Taking a problem solving approach, the book seeks to demonstrate how straightforward and logical changes to the existing global legal architecture would address some of the fundamental root causes of environmental degradation. It puts forward a draft global environmental right that would integrate duties for both state and non-state actors within reformed systems of environmental governance and a rational framework for business and industry to adhere to in order that those systems could be made operational. It also examines the failures of the existing international climate change regime and explains how the draft global environmental right could remedy existing deficits.

Citation

(2014) A Global Environmental Right. Earthscan by Routledge.

Book

A Global Environmental Right

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

The Scope of Action for Local Climate Policy: The Case of Norway (C. Aall, K. Groven & G. Lindseth)

Author(s)

Carlo Aall, Kyrre Groven and Gard Lindseth

Keywords

Global environmental governance, local, national, global, government, local climate policy planning, Norway, local responsibility

Abstract

One of the key features of the post-Rio era has been how global environmental governance is mediated between local, national and global levels of government. In this article, we draw on experiences from local climate policy planning in Norway in order to discuss the ways in which climate change enters into a municipal policy setting. Based on the Norwegian case, supplemented with knowledge gained from an international literature review, we present a typology of six different categories of local climate policy. We highlight that local actors can both play the role as a structure for the implementation of national or international climate objectives, as well as that of being policy actors taking independent policy initiatives. We emphasize how the relationship between national and local authorities is a crucial factor if climate policy as a specific local responsibility should be further strengthened.

Citation

(2007) 7 Global Environmental Politics 83-101

Paper

The Scope of Action for Local Climate Policy: The Case of Norway

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

The Problem of Consumption (P. Dauvergne)

Author

Peter Dauvergne ( University of British Columbia , Canada )

Keywords

Consumption, drivers, consequences, global environmental governance, green consumption, complexity

Abstract

One of the biggest challenges for global environmental governance is “the problem of consumption.” The task involves far more than simply influencing what consumers choose, use, and discard. It requires a concerted effort to address the systemic drivers—including advertising, economic growth, technology, income inequality, corporations, population growth, and globalization—that shape the quantities, costs, and distribution of consumer goods. Current efforts to green consumption are “improving” management on many measures, such as per unit energy and resource use. Yet, this essay argues, such “progress” needs to be seen in the context of a rising global population and rising per capita consumption, where states and companies displace much of the costs of consumption far from those who are doing most of the consuming. This raises many questions about the value of sub-global measures for evaluating the environmental effectiveness of efforts to govern consumption. It also suggests the need for more global cooperation to mitigate the ecological effects of consumption. Current international initiatives such as the Marrakech process to draft a 10-Year Framework on “sustainable production and consumption,” however, will need to go well beyond simply promoting efficiencies, new technologies, and a greening of household consumption. Researchers in global environmental politics can assist here by probing even further into the complexity of governing the drivers and consequences of consumption, then working to thread these findings into the international policy process.

Citation

(2010) 10 Global Environmental Politics 1-10

Paper

The Problem of Consumption

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Multilevel Governance of Global Environmental Change (G. Winter)

Editor

Gerd Winter (Universität Bremen)

Keywords

Earth System Analysis, global climate change, global environmental change, global environmental governance, green civil society, self-regulation, industry, law, private authority, global governance, transnational corporations, international environmental law, transboundary corporate responsibility, USA, transnational bureaucracy networks, EU, post-Communist states, multilateral environmental agreements, compliance continuum, regulatory competition, developing countries, policy instrument innovation, sovereignty, environmental liability, environmental principles

Abstract

Originally published in 2006, this collection is the outcome of an interdisciplinary research project involving scholars in the fields of international and comparative environmental law, the sociology and politics of global governance, and the scientific study of global climate change. Earth system analysis as developed by the natural sciences is transferred to the analysis of institutions of global environmental change. Rather than one overarching supranational organisation, a system of ‘multilevel’ institutions is advocated. The book examines the proper role of industrial self-regulation, of horizontal transfer of national policies, of regional integration, and of improved coordination between international environmental organisations, as well as basic principles for sustainable use of resources. Addressing both academics and politicians, this book will stimulate the debate about the means of improving global governance.

• Examines the highly topical issue of the impact of institutions on climate change • Unique combination of a holistic and interdisciplinary approach • Written by an international team of researchers from Europe, the USA, Canada, and India

Citation

Gerd Winter (ed), Multilevel Governance of Global Environmental Change: Perspectives from Science, Sociology and the Law (CUP, 2010)

Book

Multilevel Governance of Global Environmental Change: Perspectives from Science, Sociology and the Law

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail