Tag Archives: epistemology

Research Handbook on Human Rights and the Environment (A. Grear and L.J. Kotzé eds)

Editor

Anna Grear and Louis J. Kotzé

Keywords

Human rights, environment, epistemology, Ecological Subjectivities, natural law, United Nations, Australasia, New Zealand, environmental justice, Inter-American Court of Human Rights, Aarhus, climate displacement, North-South, ecosystem services

Abstract

Bringing together leading international scholars in the field, this authoritative Handbook combines critical and doctrinal scholarship to illuminate some of the challenging tensions in the legal relationships between humans and the environment, and human rights and environment law.

The accomplished contributors provide researchers and students with a rich source of reflection and engagement with the topic. Split into five parts, the book covers epistemologies, core values and closures, constitutionalisms, universalisms and regionalisms, with a final concluding section exploring major challenges and alternative futures.

An essential resource for students and scholars of human rights law, the volume will also be of significant interest to those in the fields of environmental and constitutional law.

Citation

(2015) Edward Elgar

Book

Research Handbook on Human Rights and the Environment

 

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Ecological responsibilities: which trees? Where? Why? (L. Code)

Author

Lorraine Code

Keywords

Ecological thinking, epistemic location, epistemology, Haraway, situatedness, Vandana Shiva, subjectivity, trees

Abstract

The author offers a provocative engagement with the implicit epistemological framework of Stone’s famous question ‘should trees have standing?’, arguing for an epistemological remapping of the issues invoked by and implicit in it. Specifically, the author argues that the question of whether ‘trees’ do or should have standing is best understood as being ‘answerable situationally, locally, with reference to a specific society, ethos, and social-epistemic imaginary’ – for the question bears epistemological, moral-political and factual elements rendering it best understood as a ‘situated question’ – hence: ‘Which trees? Where? And to what ends?’ Answering Stone’s question (thus reformulated) requires ‘knowing responsibly and well, ecologically – horizontally and not just vertically – the specific situations and meanings of the trees in question’. The author concludes that the emergence and effects of ecological thinking, with its ‘various and variously situtuated modalities’ suggests that ‘trees in diverse parts of the world in the early twenty-first are not the same trees Christopher Stone was writing about’.

Citation

(2012) Issue 0 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 84-99

Paper

Ecological responsibilities: which trees? Where? Why?

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The Epistemic Demands of Environmental Virtue (J. Kawall)

Author

Jason Kawall

Keywords

Environmental virtue, Epistemology, Ideal observer, Information, Virtue ethics

Abstract

To lead an environmentally virtuous life requires information—about morality, environmental issues, the impacts of our actions and commitments, our options for alternatives, and so on. On the other hand, we are finite beings with limited time and resources. We cannot feasibly investigate all of our options, and all environmental issues (let alone moral issues, more broadly). In this paper I attempt to provide initial steps towards addressing the epistemic demands of environmental virtue. In the first half of the paper I provide rules of thumb with respect to (1) how to prioritize our investigations into various issues, and (2) what kinds of information we should seek with respect to these issues, and the levels of epistemic justification we ought to attain. In the second half of the paper, I turn to a modified virtue ethics, appealing to the attitudes of virtuous ideal observers to provide characterizations of morally justified and morally non-culpable actions. I then apply these latter concepts in assessing agents, their actions and projects (with respect to environmental virtue), in light of their investigative efforts, and given their particular circumstances.

Citation

(2010) 23 Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 109-128

Paper

The Epistemic Demands of Environmental Virtue

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Ecofeminism as Politics: Nature, Marx and the Post Modern (A. Salleh)

Author

Ariel Salleh

Keywords

Women, Ecopolitics, Ecology, History, Ecofeminist Actions, Embodied Materialism, Body Logic, 1/0 Culture, Man/Woman=Nature, Postcolonial Sense, Feminism, Terra Nullius, Barefoot Epistemology, Energy/Labour Flows

Abstract

This book explores the philosophical and political challenge of ecofeminism. It shows how the ecology movement has been held back by conceptual confusion over the implications of gender difference, while much that passes in the name of feminism is actually an obstacle to ecological change and global democracy. The author argues that ecofeminism reaches beyond contemporary social movements being a political synthesis of four revolutions in one: ecology is feminism is socialism is post-colonial struggle.

Informed by a critical postmodern reading of the Marxist tradition, Salleh‘s ecofeminism integrates discourses on science, the body, culture, nature, political economy. The book opens with a short history of the ecofeminism. Part two establishes the basis for its epistemological challenge while the third part consists of ecofeminist deconstructions of deep ecology, social ecology, eco-socialism and postmodern feminism. In the final section, Salleh suggests that a powerful way forward can be found in commonalities between ecofeminist and indigenous struggles.

Citation

Ariel Salleh, Ecofeminism as Politics: Nature, Marx and the Post Modern (Zed Books, 2006)

Book

Ecofeminism as Politics: Nature, Marx and the Post Modern

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