Tag Archives: energy

Upcoming Seminar: Fourth Annual Rule of Law and Sustainable Development Seminar

On the 13th of April 2018 the Regional African Law and Human Security Programme (RALHUS), at UWC, in conjunction with the South African Research Chair in International Law, at UJ, will host the Fourth Annual Rule of Law and Sustainable Development Seminar, in Stellenbosch, South Africa.

The topic of the seminar is The International Climate Change Regime, Modern Sustainable Energy and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Goal 13 of Agenda 2030 mandates states to “take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts’”. SDG 13 affirms that the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change. Reciprocal acknowledgement of the SDGs by the UNFCCC regime can be found in Decision 1/CP.21 adopted at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP) where the COP welcomed the adoption of the SDGs, in particular Goal 13. The Paris Agreement provides for several mechanisms to address climate change in order to further sustainable development and SDG 13. As such the preamble of the Paris Agreement explicitly acknowledges “the need to promote universal access to sustainable energy in developing countries, in particular in Africa, through the enhanced development of renewable energy”. Furthermore, the UNFCCC refers to energy efficiency in its preamble as a measure to counteract increasing energy consumption. These references lend considerable support to SDG 7 on sustainable energy, in particular targets 7.1 and 7.2 and the potential that the climate change regime has to induce sustainable energy projects.

Please contact Werner Scholtz (wscholtz@uwc.ac.za) for further information.

Feature image: Josh Gellers

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Globalization, Environmental Justice, and Sustainable Development: The Case of Oil (Hymel)

Author

Monica L Hymel

Keywords

Energy, environment, tax, oil, environmental justice, sustainable development

Abstract

As globalization expands, poverty abounds, the environment suffers, and scientists warn of the devastation to come as earth’s temperature rises. Likewise, the last century has seen a dramatic increase in the human lifespan and life comforts. People travel the world with ease and comfort – unimaginable even 60 years ago. Oil plays a pivotal role in these problems and accomplishments. However, oil consumption has dramatically damaged our environment. Power struggles over controlling oil threaten global security. This paper discusses the economics of oil in the context of globalization, environmental justice, and sustainable development. The paper analyzes policies that have resulted in oil’s world dominance, and those policies needed to break oil’s hold on the global economy.

Citation

(2006) Macquarie Law Review; Arizona Legal Studies Discussion Paper No. 06-38.

Publication

Globalization, Environmental Justice, and Sustainable Development: The Case of Oil

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Deepwater blowout was “almost inevitable” (Anon)

Keywords

Health and safety at work, Energy, Environment, Europe, Fatal accidents, Oil pollution, Oil rigs, Regulatory bodies, United States

Abstract

Reports on the findings of the US Presidential commission investigating the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico , looking at the responsibility of the oil company, its contractors and US regulators. Reproduces figures comparing offshore oil industry fatalities in the US and Europe .

Citation

( March 4, 2011 ) Health & Safety at Work

Report

Deepwater blowout was “almost inevitable”

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Bringing the Food Economy Home: Local Alternatives to Global Agribusiness (H. Norberg-Hodge, et al)

Author(s)

Helena Norberg-Hodge, Todd Merrifield and Steven Gorelick

Keywords

Rural communities, Unmanageable cities, Food Security, Corporate control, Global agribusiness, Homogenized food supply, Local foods, Transport, Energy, Agricultural subsidies, Buying local, Economic structures, Local food regulations, People power, Lessons from Cuba

Abstract

If the many social, environmental, and economic crises facing the planet are to be reversed, a good place to start is to rebuild local food economies. Food is something everyone, everywhere, needs every day, so even small changes in the way it is produced and marketed can offer immense benefits.

Bringing the Food Economy Home shows how a shift towards the local would protect and rebuild agricultural diversity. It would give farmers a bigger share of the money spent on food, and provide consumers with healthier, fresher food at more affordable prices. It would reduce transport, greenhouse gas emissions, and the need for toxic agricultural chemicals. It would lessen the need for storage, packaging, refrigeration and artificial additives. And it would help revitalize rural economies and communities in both the industrialized and the developing world.

With benefits for farmer and consumer, for urban and rural dweller, and for the economy as well as the environment, local food is a powerful solution-multiplier, one that we cannot afford to ignore.

Citation

Helena Norberg-Hodge, Todd Merrifield and Steven Gorelick, Bringing the Food Economy Home: Local Alternatives to Global Agribusiness (Zed Books, 2002)

Book

Bringing the Food Economy Home: Local Alternatives to Global Agribusiness

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Human Rights and Arctic Resources (R.M. Bratspies)

Author

Rebecca M. Bratspies

Keywords

Human rights, property, indigenous rights, Belize, Arctic, regulation, decision making, energy, climate change, natural resources, Chukci Sea

Abstract

Because the res nullius, the unowned thing, is potentially the property of whoever successfully claims it, the scramble to claim and exploit resources deemed “unowned” has been a black chapter of human history. Cherished social and human values have been trampled in the rush for riches. The very idea of an “owned” versus an “unowned” resource, be it land, oil or living organisms, is, of course, a political construct, fraught with unspoken value judgments about the kind of use or possession worthy of that recognition. Throughout history, biases and prejudices have morphed judgments about the uses sufficient to demonstrate ownership into an assessment of whose use or possession will be dignified with the label of ownership. This latter assessment, implicit in the first whenever there are competing claims to a resource, has been wielded to systematically dispossess indigenous peoples around the world.

This article explores how the developing international humanrights jurisprudence might translate into a better, more just, more environmentally responsible process for deciding the fate of Arctic resources.

Citation

(2009) 15 Southwestern Journal of Law and Trade in the Americas 251

Paper

Human Rights and Arctic Resources

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