Tag Archives: dignity

Symposium: Dignity Rights and Environmental Justice

Delaware Law School (U.S.) is pleased to announce a Symposium on Dignity Rights and Environmental Justice on 13 April 2018. The event, which will be held in Delaware and livestreamed, will examine environmental justice through the lens of human dignity and will explore how legal responses including the right to human dignity might alleviate the burdens of environmental injustice throughout the world. A diverse group of activists, policy-makers, jurists, practitioners, academics, students, and others will join us to explore principled and practical approaches to advancing environmental justice in our own local neighborhoods and in communities around the world. The event is co-sponsored by the Dignity Rights Project, Widener Law Review, Coming Clean, Delaware Concerned Residents for Environmental Justice, the First State Fund, the ABA Section on Civil Rights and Social Justice, and the Global Network for Human Rights and the Environment. For more information, please contact Erin Daly at edaly@widener.edu

Feature image: Josh Gellers

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The Roots of Influence: Nongovernmental Organizations and the Relationship Between Human Rights and the Environment (C. Tracy)

Author

Christopher Tracy

Keywords

NGOs, non-governmental organisations, human rights, environment, dignity, future generations, indigenous right, environmental protection, Rio, legitimacy, international relations

Extract

“Part I of this Article will address the history and development of NGOs. Particular attention will be given to the rationale espoused by various NGOs for their participation in certain global concerns or activities. The connections between human rights and environment NGOs will be discussed, as will the reason for this connection – namely, a “dignity” concern for living human beings, the living plant, those yet to be born and the future of this world. This connection between human rights and environmental organizations is most evident in the protection of indigenous peoples and their traditional lands.

Part II will continue the discussion by examining links between human rights and the environmental in international instruments. Although, there have been numerous connections made in previous human rights and environmental documents, the focus here will be on the developments made in Rio.

Part III will examine the tensions arising out of attempts to prioritize when human rights and environment concerns are to be addressed […]

Part IV will suggest that the NGOs’ diverse participation should continue well into the future before any major prioritization will have to occur. […]

This discussion will conclude with the suggestion that NGO involvement in the international regime will continue to grow and, as it does, a balance must be sought between legitimacy in action and vitality in mission” (pp. 24-25)

Citation

(1994) Journal of International Law and Practice 3 pp. 21-46

Paper

The Roots of Influence: Nongovernmental Organizations and the Relationship Between Human Rights and the Environment

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The human right to water and reform of the Irish water sector: Owen McIntyre

Author

Owen McIntyre

Keywords

Human right to water, water sector reform, privatization of water services, constitutional rights, bodily integrity, dignity

Abstract

The austerity measures imposed upon Ireland under the terms of the 2009 EU/IMF financial bail-out package include the introduction of charging for domestic water and sanitation services, which has led to the establishment of a new national water utility and plans to roll out a nation-wide programme for the installation of domestic water meters. The introduction of such a charging scheme raises a range of, as yet, unanswered questions concerning, for example, the use of social safety nets for those unable to pay, safeguards regarding disconnection or reduction of service in the event of non-payment, the accountability of the new utility for any failure to supply adequate water, and arrangements for meaningful public participation in decision-making concerning water services. While one would normally expect such key policy choices to be guided by the emerging human right to water and sanitation, no applicable provision of Irish law expressly supports the concept. However, policymakers might want to take account of the good governance values inherent to this emerging human right, as there exists the possibility that certain provisions of Irish law, and applicable provisions of European human rights law, might be interpreted so as to impose such values. While much of the current discourse on the human right to water and sanitation concerns its possible application in developing countries, Ireland might hold lessons for other developed countries facing austerity-driven water sector reform, including arrangements for the privatization of water and sanitation services.

Citation

(2014) 5/1 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 74-101

Paper

The human right to water and reform of the Irish water sector

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Equality – Finding Space in Environmental Discourse (L Feris)

Author

Loretta Feris

Keywords

Equality, dignity, environment, human rights, policy impacts, marginalised people

Abstract

This paper explores the relationship between the environment and human rights values such as equality and dignity, including the equality of dignity. It argues that environmental impacts cannot be divorced from these values and that equality and dignity can be very useful tools in interrogating the impacts of policies aimed at protecting environmental resources of marginalised individuals and groups of people.

Citation

(2013) 3/5 Onati Socio-Legal Series 877-892

Paper

Equality – Finding Space in Environmental Discourse

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