PPT Session on Human Rights, Fracking, and Climate Change

Spring Creek Project at Oregon State University will co-host the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal Session on Human Rights, Fracking, and Climate Change from May 14 to 18, 2018.

The panel of judges of the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal will be asked to provide an advisory opinion on four central questions:

  1. Under what circumstances do fracking and other unconventional oil and gas extraction techniques breach human rights protected by international law as a matter of treaty or custom?
  2. Under what circumstances do fracking and other unconventional oil and gas extraction techniques warrant the issuance of either provisional measures, a judgment enjoining further activity, remediation relief, or damages for causing environmental harm?
  3. What is the extent of responsibility and liability of States and non-State actors for violations of human rights and for environmental and climate harm caused by these oil and gas extraction techniques?
  4. What is the extent of responsibility and liability of States and non-State actors, both legal and moral, for violations of the rights of nature related to environmental and climate harm caused by these unconventional oil and gas extraction techniques?

For the first time this session of the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal will be hosted completely online.  Attorneys and witnesses will convene via Zoom web conferencing software each day to present evidence and testimony to the panel of the judges of the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal.

The proceedings will be streamed on the Spring Creek Project Facebook page and in the OSU Student Experience Center. A full schedule of daily Tribunal proceedings will be available soon, on the Spring Creek Project websiteand on tribunalonfracking.org

More: http://permanentpeoplestribunal.org/may-14-18-2018-ppt-session-on-human-rights-fracking-and-climate-change/?lang=en

14-18 de Mayo: Sesión del Tribunal Permanente de los Pueblos sobre Derechos humanos, fracking y cambio climático

El Proyecto Spring Creek en la Universidad Estatal de Oregón será coanfitrión de la sesión del Tribunal Permanente de los Pueblos sobre Derechos Humanos, Fracking y Cambio Climático desde el 14 hasta el 18 de mayo de 2018.

Se pedirá al panel de jueces del Tribunal Permanente de los Pueblos que brinde una Opinión consultiva sobre cuatro preguntas centrales:

  1. ¿Bajo qué circunstancias el fracking y otras técnicas de extracción de petróleo y gas no convencionales violan los derechos humanos protegidos por el derecho internacional?
  2. ¿En qué circunstancias el fracking y otras técnicas de extracción de petróleo y gas no convencionales justifican la emisión de medidas provisionales, un juicio que ordena nuevas actividades, medidas correctivas o daños por causar daño ambiental?
  3. ¿Cuál es el alcance de la responsabilidad y la responsabilidad de los Estados y los agentes no estatales por las violaciones de los derechos humanos y por los daños ambientales y climáticos causados por estas técnicas de extracción de petróleo y gas?
  4. ¿Cuál es el alcance de la responsabilidad y la responsabilidad de los Estados y actores no estatales, tanto legales como morales, por violaciones de los derechos de la naturaleza relacionados con el daño ambiental y climático causado por estas técnicas de extracción de petróleo y gas no convencionales?

Por primera vez, esta sesión del Tribunal Permanente de los Pueblos será realizada completamente en internet. Los abogados y testigos se reunirán a través del software de conferencia web Zoom todos los días para presentar evidencias y testimonios ante el panel de jueces del Tribunal Permanente de los Pueblos.

El procedimiento se transmitirá en el Spring Creek Project Facebook page y en el OSU Student Experience Center. El programa completo de los procedimientos diarios del Tribunal estará disponible en: Spring Creek Project website y tribunalonfracking.org

15-18 maggio 2018: Sessione su Diritti umani, fracking e cambiamento climatico

La Sessione del Tribunale Permanente dei Popoli su Diritti umani, fracking e cambiamento climatico sarà ospitata dallo Spring Creek Project dell’Oregon State University e si terrà dal 14 al 18 maggio 2018.

giudici nominati dal Tribunale sono chiamati a valutare:

  1. In quali circostanze il fracking e altre tecniche non convenzionali di estrazione del petrolio e del gas violano i diritti umani tutelati dal diritto internazionale?
  2. In quali circostanze il fracking e altre tecniche non convenzionali di estrazione del petrolio e del gas determinano o misure provvisorie, una valutazione che impone ulteriori controlli, interventi di risanamento o rischi ambientali?
  3. Qual è l’entità della responsabilità degli Stati e degli attori non statali per le violazioni dei diritti umani e per i danni ambientali e climatici causati da queste tecniche di estrazione del petrolio e del gas?
  4. Qual è l’entità della della responsabilità degli Stati e degli attori non statali, sia legale che morale, per le violazioni dei diritti della natura connessi ai danni ambientali e climatici causati da queste tecniche non convenzionali di estrazione del petrolio e del gas?

La Sessione del Tribunale Permanente dei Popoli sarà realizzata utilizzando il software zoom, una piattaforma di videoconferenza online che permetterà ad esperti e testimoni di presentare analisi e casi ai giudici del Tribunale. Il live streaming sarà disponibile sulla pagina di Facebook dello Spring Creek Project e presso l’OSU Student Experience Center. Il programma della Sessione sarà presto consultabile nei seguenti siti: Spring Creek Project website e tribunalonfracking.org

Maggiori informazioni: http://permanentpeoplestribunal.org/15-18-maggio-2018-sessione-su-diritti-umani-fracking-e-cambiamento-climatico/

Feature image: Dina Townsend

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Announcement: Open Call for NGOs to apply for Consultative Status with the United Nations (Deadline: 1 June 2018)

Open Call for NGOs to apply for Consultative Status with the United Nations (Deadline: 1 June 2018)

NGOs interested in applying for Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) consultative status should submit their application and required documents on or before the deadline of 1 June 2018. The following link provides background information, the benefits of consultative status and instructions for how to apply:

https://bit.ly/2ozYpVw

Feature image: Anna Grear

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Job opportunity: Dean of Macquarie Law School

Macquarie is seeking a visionary leader, committed to a genuinely collegial, collaborative, high performing culture. The right candidate will have strong strategic skills, a demonstrable track record of academic leadership and of managing change, resources and people, an excellent track record in a research area related to the School and a strong commitment to education. A PhD is essential.

CLOSING DATE: 15th April 2018

ENQUIRIES AND APPLICATIONS:

Initial enquiries to: Brenda Gibbons on +61 421 388 657 or brenda@carolwatson.com.au or to Kim Lew on +61 438 664 281 or kim.lew@carolwatson.com.au

Applications to: debbie@carolwatson.com.au

Read more about this position here: http://jobs.mq.edu.au/cw/en/job/498740/dean-of-macquarie-law-school

Feature image by Anna Grear

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Call for papers: “Searching for Critical Environmental Law: Theories, Methods, Critiques”

Searching for Critical Environmental Law: Theories, Methods, Critiques

CALL FOR PAPERS
WORK SHOP, MAY 11, 2018 in Oxford

CO-ORGANIZED BY ANDREAS KOTSAKIS , OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY & VITO DELUCIA, UIT ARCTIC UNIVERSITY OF NORWAY

The field of critical environmental law has yet to develop any consistent self-awareness as a set of problematisations, methods and theories of either law or the environment, despite promising work in recent years. With this realisation as the point of departure, the aim of this workshop is to debate the conception and role of this field of legal scholarship. Critical environmental law is understood as an enquiry into the theoretical and institutional apparatus of both environmental law and the rationality of environmentalism. It seeks to problematise standard ontological, epistemological and axiological narratives from an interdisciplinary perspective, and to find and expose the slippages at the margins of the intersection between law and ecology.

However, any conceptual or practical project of critical environmental law must now contend with our contemporary condition; the continuing crisis of capitalism framing a period of protestations, uprisings and revolts, a general discontent in the context of which the operation of an objective, depoliticised and scientifically -derived environmental law as an essential element of liberal environmentalism appears increasingly strained. But was it ever effective in the first place? On the other hand, critiques of environmental science can serve projects that are inimical to the political commitments of critical thought. How can critiques of the limitations of liberal and managerial notions of environmental law thrive in the world of denialism and extremism? In this context, the fields of international, transnational and comparative environmental law have become even more important in combating the geographically restricted nature of environmental law scholarship.

Therefore, this call for papers invites contributions that grapple with the challenge of conceiving and critiquing the relation between law and the environment through innovative ideas, categories and instruments, and in the contemporary context of crisis and contestation. Contributions from international, transnational, comparative or domestic perspective are welcome.

Possible themes include, but are not restricted to:
 What is critical environmental law? What can it be? What are its methodological commitments and ethical orientations?
 What are the limits – conceptual, political, practical – of environmental law?
 Relation between environmental law and resistance
 Relation between environmental law and science
 Critical readings of the law in/on the Anthropocene
 Critical thought and the environment
 Evaluating Earth jurisprudence/wild law approaches
 Transnational and comparative approaches to environmental law
 What is the specific dimension of critical international environmental law?

Please send abstracts of 500 words to Andreas Kotsakis – akotsakis@brookes.ac.uk and Vito De Lucia – vito.delucia@uit.no by April 3, 2018.

Limited funding is available for travel and accommodation in Oxford. We will communicate decisions on the workshop by April 8, 2018.

Feature image: Anna Grear

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Upcoming Seminar: Fourth Annual Rule of Law and Sustainable Development Seminar

On the 13th of April 2018 the Regional African Law and Human Security Programme (RALHUS), at UWC, in conjunction with the South African Research Chair in International Law, at UJ, will host the Fourth Annual Rule of Law and Sustainable Development Seminar, in Stellenbosch, South Africa.

The topic of the seminar is The International Climate Change Regime, Modern Sustainable Energy and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Goal 13 of Agenda 2030 mandates states to “take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts’”. SDG 13 affirms that the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change. Reciprocal acknowledgement of the SDGs by the UNFCCC regime can be found in Decision 1/CP.21 adopted at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP) where the COP welcomed the adoption of the SDGs, in particular Goal 13. The Paris Agreement provides for several mechanisms to address climate change in order to further sustainable development and SDG 13. As such the preamble of the Paris Agreement explicitly acknowledges “the need to promote universal access to sustainable energy in developing countries, in particular in Africa, through the enhanced development of renewable energy”. Furthermore, the UNFCCC refers to energy efficiency in its preamble as a measure to counteract increasing energy consumption. These references lend considerable support to SDG 7 on sustainable energy, in particular targets 7.1 and 7.2 and the potential that the climate change regime has to induce sustainable energy projects.

Please contact Werner Scholtz (wscholtz@uwc.ac.za) for further information.

Feature image: Josh Gellers

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