Category Archives: Gender

Payment for ‘ecosystem services’ and the ‘green economy’: green-washing or something new? (K. Wilkinson)

Author

Kate Wilkinson

Keywords

ecofeminism, green economy, payment for ecosystem services, ecosystems, environment, capitalism, free market, economics, REDDES, REDD+, UNFCCC, ITTO, forests, natural resources, gender, participation

Abstract

Using an ecofeminist critical analysis, this paper examines the extent to which two forest-related ‘payments for ecosystem services’ (PES) schemes maintain a mainstream anti-nature and exploitative conceptualization of human/nature relationships. It does so by integrating various ecofeminist themes to analyse the two PES schemes and to assess the extent to which they can protect women and nature while marketizing and commodifying the environment. The author examines the justifications for integrating PES into a green economy, including the proposed benefits resulting from the implementation of PES, and safeguards ensuring the inclusion and participation of local communities. The author concludes that an ecofeminist examination highlights the inherently exploitative nature of PES and its continuation of the currently exploitative free market paradigm.

Citation

(2014) 5/2 Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 168-191

Paper

Payment for ‘ecosystem services’ and the ‘green economy’: green-washing or something new?

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Right to food; right to feed; right to be fed. The intersection of women’s rights and the right to food (P. Van Esterik)

Author

Penny Van Esterik

Keywords

Food and human rights, Food security, Gender, Policy, Women

Abstract

This paper explores conceptual and practical linkages between women and food, and argues that foodsecurity cannot be realized until women are centrally included in policy discussions about food. Women’s special relationship with food is culturally constructed and not a natural division of labor. Women’s identity and sense of self is often based on their ability to feed their families and others; food insecurity denies them this right. Thus the interpretation of food as a humanright requires that food issues be analyzed from a gender perspective. For example, the paper asks how the rights to food intersect with the rights of women and other human rights; what the policy implications of these intersecting rights are; and how their integration will contribute to the effort to view all human rights as mutually reinforcing, universal, and indivisible. The second half of the paper speculates on the significance of distinctions between the right to be fed, the right to food, and the right to feed for understanding the relation between gender and food.

Citation

(1999) 16 Agriculture and Human Values 225-232

Paper

Right to food; right to feed; right to be fed. The intersection of women’s rights and the right to food

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Unequal burden: water privatisation and women’s human rights in Tanzania (R. Brown)

Author

Rebecca Brown

Keywords

water, privatisation, Tanzania, women, human rights, equality

Abstract

Access to water is a critical component in advancing the human rights of women. Although privatisation of water services continues to be pushed by donors such as The World Bank, the available information shows that privatisations are not increasing access to water for poor women. This paper examines the human right to water and why this right is critical for women and girls. It then discusses privatisation, and the tension between contractual obligations and respect for human rights. Finally, it explores some strategies and successes from women’s involvement in the struggle against water privatisation in Tanzania.

Citation

(2010) 18 Gender & Development 59-67

Paper

Unequal burden: water privatisation and women’s human rights in Tanzania

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Sourcing gender: gender productivity and sustainable sourcing strategies (A. Boodhna)

Author

Anoushka Boodhna

Keywords

(NBMSTR) project; business opportunities; women; agriculture; smallholders; vulnerability

Abstract

As part of a series of topic briefs on the New Business Models for Sustainable Trading Relationships (NBMSTR) project, this paper will describe the business opportunities that are available when working with women in agriculture. In so doing, this paper adds a new dimension to understanding trading relationships with smallholders by segmenting the producer base and understanding the implications of vulnerability and power relations on application of the NBMSTR principles. To analyse the problem and develop an actionorientated set of recommendations, a gendered approach to value chain analysis will be carried out.

Citation

Anoushka Boodhna, ‘Sourcing gender: gender productivity and sustainable sourcing strategies’ (IIED, Jul 2011)

Book

Sourcing gender: gender productivity and sustainable sourcing strategies

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Gender Equality for Smarter Cities: Challenges and Progress (UN-HABITAT)

Author

UN-HABITAT

Keywords

Towns and cities gender inequalities; urbanisation

Abstract

Towns and cities are increasingly important places for tackling gender inequalities. This book highlights some of the key gender issues we face in the context of rapid urbanisation in the developing world. It also provides an overview of UN-HABITAT’s work in promoting gender equality in all its activities and programmes. Creating equal opportunities and protecting rights for both women and men contributes to better living conditions for the urban poor and achievement of the Millennium development goals.

Citation

UN-HABITAT, Gender Equality for Smarter Cities: Challenges and Progress(UN-HABITAT, 2009)

Report

Gender Equality for Smarter Cities: Challenges and Progress

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