Category Archives: Environment v Economy

Workers’ Rights and Pollution Control in Delhi (K.D. Alley & D. Meadows)

Authors

K.D. Alley & D. Meadows

Keywords

Human Rights, Environmental Rights, Constitutional Law, India, Right to a Clean Environment, Pollution

Abstract

Within India’s judicial interpretation of constitutional rights there exists a close link between environmental values and human rights. Yet in some instances court cases defending the right to a clean environment have actually jeopardized the job security of India’s poorest laborers and have led to abuses of human rights. One such example is the 1995 Supreme Court case MC Mehta v. Union of India, which ordered the closure and relocation of polluting industries in Delhi. In this instance the Court responded to middle-class appeals for pollution remediation through a broad reading of the constitution’s fundamental right to life principle, at the same time adversely affecting tens, even hundreds, of thousands of the city’s poorest workers.

The spotty interest of the government’s legislative and executive branches in addressing the environmental problems created by both private and public sector development initiatives has provided the impetus for legal activism in India. Parliament has enacted environmental legislation, but enforcement has been profoundly lax, and governmental pollution control boards have been lenient in regulating industrial and vehicular emissions and industrial and municipal waste treatment facilities. Moreover, projects involving air and water pollution, massive human displacement, and the destruction of natural ecosystems continue to go forward with the imprimatur of formal administrative approval, based on only perfunctory or formalistic compliance with regulatory norms.

Citation

(2004) 11 Human Rights Dialogue 15

Paper

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Gas Flaring, Environmental Corporate Responsibility and the Right to a Healthy Environment: The Case of the Niger Delta (B.E. Umukoro)

Author

Brown E. Umukoro

Keywords

Human Rights, Environmental Rights, Right to Life, Constitutional Law, Nigeria, Oil, Public Policy

Extract

Introduction
[…]
In this chapter, we thus discuss the national legal framework for the continuation of gas flaring in Nigeria, the advancement of the concept of threat to right to life to include harmful activities of multinational companies and how these companies can be held accountable for the environmental degradation caused by oil exploration activities in Nigeria. It then closes with some valuable suggestions for strengthening the will of the Nigerian government in overcoming its weakness in the effective enforcement of environmental laws and policies.

Citation

(2009) in Law and Petroleum Industry in Nigeria: Current Challenges, 49, Eneri and Deinduomo (Eds.), Malthouse Law Books

Paper

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The Judicial Recognition and Enforcement of the Right to Environment: Differing Perspectives from Nigeria and India (R. Temitope Ako)

Author

Rhuks Temitope Ako

Keywords

Human Rights, Environmental Rights, Comparative Law, Common Law, Constitutional Law, Nigeria, India, Political Economy, Oil

Abstract

Environmental rights are one of the emerging rights in the arena of international human rights law and international environmental law. This paper analyses the judiciary’s roles in advancing the right to a healthy environment in Nigeria and India. These two countries have certain similarities and yet there exists a remarkable difference between the levels of recognition of the right to environment in both countries. The concept of environment rights will be traced by drawing the link between the environment, human rights and sustainable development. Further, the Nigerian oil industry has impacts on the country’s political economy and the environment of host-communities. In fact, there are reasons why there are certain peculiarities that Nigerian courts face in deciding oil-related environmental cases. An analysis of legal provisions and statutes of both the countries will be presented to highlight the status of the right to environment.

Citation

(2010) 3 National University of Juridical Sciences Law Review 423

Paper

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The Right to a Satisfactory Environment and the Africa Commission (K. Ebeku)

Author

Kaniye Ebeku

Keywords

Human Rights, Right to a Healthy Environment, Comparative Law, Common Law, Islamic Law, Constitutional Law, Africa, Nigeria, Oil

Extract

Summary
This article emphasises that the right to a satisfactory, healthy or clean environment is enshrined in over 60 constitutions from all regions of the world. Moreover, it is suggested that there is an increasing trend by victims of environmental damage to invoke human rights for protection and redress. National courts and global and regional human rights monitoring bodies, such as the UN Human Rights Committee and the Inter-American Commission, have addressed this issue. It is encouraging that the African Commission recently decided a case concerning the impact of oil operations in the Niger Delta, concluding that the African Charter recognises the importance of a clean and safe environment. The decision recognises a nexus between socio-economic rights and the right to environment to the extent that the environment affects the quality of life and safety of individuals and groups. In finding Nigeria in violation of the Charter, the Commission stated that the right to a satisfactory environment ‘requires the state to take reasonable and other measures to prevent pollution and ecological degradation, to promote conservation, and to secure an ecologically sustainable development and use of natural resources’.

Citation

(2003) 3 African Human Rights Law Journal 150

Paper

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The Right to Know and the Duty to Disclose: Pathways to Effective Monitoring, Reporting, and Verification Within the Constitutionalism of Climate Justice (T. Thorp)

Author

Teresa Thorp

Keywords

Right to Information, Human Rights, Environmental Law, Equity, International Law

Abstract

The Article is in two parts. Part one examines the dynamic interactions between the right to information, human rights, and environmental law from an objective perspective. It situates monitoring, reporting, and verification (MRV) within a new architecture of human rights as “people’s rights.” Part two then delves into how international human rights and environmental law may inform a “subjective” test of equity by mobilizing the “right to information” in international climate law. In doing so, it shows how a new approach to international legal architecture, one based on “people’s rights,” may help to improve the effectiveness of MRV in terms of multi-nodal and multi-level governance.

Citation

(2012) 30 Pace Environmental Law Review 140

Paper

The Right to Know and the Duty to Disclose: Pathways to Effective Monitoring, Reporting, and Verification Within the Constitutionalism of Climate Justice

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