Category Archives: Animal Rights

Human rights: EC law – legality of fox-hunting ban (N. McKay & S. Foster)

Author(s)

Nikki McKay and Steve Foster

Keywords

Human rights, Animals, European Union, EC law, Free movement of goods, Freedom of association, Freedom to provide services, Hunting, Necessary in democratic society, Peaceful enjoyment of possessions, Right to respect for private and family life

Abstract

Examines the House of Lords decision in R. (on the application of Countryside Alliance) v Attorney General on whether the ban on fox hunting under the Hunting Act 2004 infringed: (1) the rights of hunters under the European Convention on Human Rights 1950 arts 8 and 11; and (2) the rights of parties who were involved in hunting occupationally under Protocol 1 art.1 of the Convention and the EC Treaty arts 28 and 49. Considers whether any interference with the human rights of the parties was justifiable and necessary in a democratic society.

Citation

(2008) 13(1) Coventry Law Journal 64-67

Paper

Human rights: European Community law – legality of fox-hunting ban

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Hunting not comparable to religious belief and hunters not an ethnic group (H.L. MacQueen, et al)

Author(s)

Hector L. MacQueen and Scott Wortley

Keywords

Human rights, Freedom of expression, Freedom of thought conscience and religion, Hunting, Right to respect for private and family life, Scotland

Abstract 

Comments on the House of Lords ruling in Friend v Lord Advocate on whether the restrictions on hunting in the Protection of Wild Mammals ( Scotland ) Act 2002 breached the applicant’s rights under the European Convention on Human Rights 1950. Considers whether the applicant’s right to hunt was comparable to religious beliefs and whether hunters were an ethnic group whose customs and practices were entitled to protection.

Citation   

(2008) 12(2) Edinburgh Law Review 165-166

Case Comment

Hunting “not comparable to religious belief” and hunters “not an ethnic group”

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

The regulatory challenge of animal cloning for food – the risks of risk regulation in the European Union (M. Weimer)

Author

Maria Weimer

Keywords

Food, European Union, Science, Cloning, EU law, Ethics, Food, Genetically modified organisms, Regulation, Risk;, Scientific uncertainty, United States

Abstract

Examines the debate in the EU on the appropriate regulatory response to the marketing of food produced from cloned animals, a practice on the verge of commercialisation in the global food market, particularly in the US. Reviews the current state of political, scientific and public opinion in the EU on the ethics and safety of animal cloning. Discusses the European Commission’s proposed reforms to Regulation 258/97 (Novel Foods Regulation) to extend its scope to food products from cloned animals. Considers the likelihood that this regulation will prove as controversial as the EU response to genetically modified organisms.

Citation

(2010) 1(1) European Journal of Risk Regulation 31-39

Paper

The regulatory challenge of animal cloning for food – the risks of risk regulation in the European Union

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Wildlife reforms in Scotland (C.T. Reid)

Author

Colin T. Reid

Keywords

Animals, Agriculture, Environment, Badgers, Deer, Game, Heather and grass burning, Non-native species, Scotland, Sites of special scientific interest, Wildlife

Abstract

Reflects on the main reforms proposed by the Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Bill 2010, including those concerning the game laws, snaring, non-native species, deer, badgers, sites of special scientific interest and muirburn.

Citation

(2010) 12(4) Environmental Law Review 256-265

Legislative Comment

Wildlife reforms in Scotland

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail

The international ban on ivory sales and its effects on elephant poaching in Africa (A.M. Lemieux & R.V. Clarke)

Author(s)

Andrew M. Lemieux and Ronald V. Clarke

Keywords

Animals;International law; Africa ; Endangered species; Marketing bans; Poaching

Abstract

Discusses the findings of research exploring the effectiveness of the international ban on ivory sales introduced by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species 1972 (CITES) in 1989 in increasing the elephant population in Africa. Considers the reasons for the variations in the impact of the ban on the elephant populations in the 37 African states where the animal is found, including the operation of “regulated” and “unregulated” ivory markets in some countries, and the effects of civil wars and corruption.

Citation

(2009) 49(4) British Journal of Criminology 451-471

Paper

The international ban on ivory sales and its effects on elephant poaching in Africa

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedintumblrmail